subjective


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subjective

1. existing only as perceived and not as a thing in itself
2. Med (of a symptom, condition, etc.) experienced only by the patient and incapable of being recognized or studied by anyone else
References in periodicals archive ?
H1: AFS use will be most prominent among individuals classified as low objective-high subjective, ceteris paribus, as this classification best aligns with overconfidence as defined by Koellinger, Minniti, and Schade (2007).
This experiment confirms that though feelings are subjective and the popular opinion is that each one's emotions differ, for the brain they are just a set of standard codes similar amongst people.
The investigators looked at a subjective memory symptom score based on self-report of up to seven specific, subjective memory symptoms and compared it with verbal memory decline over 6 years among 889 women with one or two copies of the high-risk apolipoprotein E epsilon-4 (APOE epsilon-4) allele and 2,972 APOE epsilon-4 noncarriers.
Lambert, Larcker, and Verrecchia (1991) and Hall and Murphy (2002) estimate the subjective value of ESOs through a certainty equivalent approach, finding it to be lower than market value owing to exogenously constrained fixed holdings in the underlying stock.
For lack of a better moniker, call this collection of theses "objective and Subjective Morality" (OSM).
Nevertheless, the CRIC requires certain objective as well as subjective conditions to be met.
While we might expect that mathematicians and scientists since De Morgan's time would be content to define probability subjectively or ignore the matter altogether, the actual history of probability since De Morgan's day is replete with mathematicians and scientists who sought to establish that probability is more than simply a measure of subjective belief.
The chapter on subjective knowledge takes us to the heart of Kierkegaard's project, and the focus is on what Piety calls "subjective immanent metaphysical knowledge.
The subjective theory of value has a long and uneasy history (Grice-Hutchinson, 1952; Hutchison, 1994).
Another candidate was appointed and Mr Morgan argued he had better experience and qualifications, and the interview panel had deviated from the agreed interview format, therefore alleging the selection process was subjective and unfair.
Energy drinks appear to alter some of the objective and subjective impairing effects of alcohol and may contribute to a high-risk scenario for the drinker, according to research published in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.
Measuring the Subjective I/Veil-Being of Nations: National Accounts of Time Use and l/Veil-Being, edited by Alan B.