subjective


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subjective

1. existing only as perceived and not as a thing in itself
2. Med (of a symptom, condition, etc.) experienced only by the patient and incapable of being recognized or studied by anyone else
References in classic literature ?
But it's all subjective, I'm sure, with possibly a bit of suggestion thrown in--that and nothing more.
Nature and literature are subjective phenomena; every evil and every good thing is a shadow which we cast.
This it is not; it has an objective existence, but no subjective.
The conversations were miles beyond Jo's comprehension, but she enjoyed it, though Kant and Hegel were unknown gods, the Subjective and Objective unintelligible terms, and the only thing `evolved from her inner consciousness' was a bad headache after it was all over.
Well, Challenger, now is your time if you wish to study the subjective phenomena of physical dissolution.
Then I looked at Wolf Larsen, but there was nothing subjective about his state of consciousness.
It is suggested chiefly by an ambiguity in the word "pain," which has misled many people, including Berkeley, whom it supplied with one of his arguments for subjective idealism.
Her conversation was chiefly of what metaphysicians term the objective cast, but every now and then it took a subjective turn.
In the castle, after they had landed, the subjective element decidedly prevailed.
Yet, as the doctor might hold such an opinion if he believed himself to be constituted differently from ordinary men; or the shipmaster adopt such a course under the impression that his vessel was a star, Agatha found false security in the subjective difference between her fellows seen from without and herself known from within.
Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine the association between academic performance and well-being (depression, subjective happiness and life satisfaction) among university students.
THE DISTINCTION BETWEEN objective and subjective reasons is quite intuitive, in part because the two seem to play different roles in normative thought.