subjective

(redirected from subjectivities)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

subjective

1. existing only as perceived and not as a thing in itself
2. Med (of a symptom, condition, etc.) experienced only by the patient and incapable of being recognized or studied by anyone else
References in periodicals archive ?
It might be objected that, in countering the myth of positive nothingness, I go too far in claiming some sort of positive connection between subjectivities, albeit a connection that doesn't preserve the individual.
Subjectivities contains much complex, suggestive, and important analysis based on broad and deep scholarly research; however, I have some criticisms.
How can their subjectivities have parity if she has her origins in his imagination?
Bruster argues that in these plays human subjectivity comes to be invested in commodified objects in a commodity fetishism which, rather than alienating the subject as in the traditional Marxist account, works as the vehicle through which subjectivities are constructed and manipulated.
Through the process of negotiating strategic alliances across their differences to heal themselves from the consequences of the injustices they have been made to suffer, the convent women create a nurturing, dialogic space from which their own refashioned subjectivities emerge, subjectivities that, collectively, can not only survive a racist and sexist culture but work to resist and redress its injustices.
The new crop of artists has a free-floating intensity, set harshly adrift from the confident subjectivities of that brief shining moment when it was possible to believe in an information-age millennium.
Perhaps for the first time in American literature, Douglass reveals the racial subjectivities involved in seeing, or in specularizing, blackness.
For our new electronic communities and digital subjectivities, whatever their local value and however subversive they might seem, are also part of an intensifying process of global polarization, segregation, and impoverishment.
In short, the character's desperate quest for unified selfhood becomes the audience's, as Jeanie Forte explains: "In this play of shifting subjectivities, a 'terrain in flux,' there is no possibility of a fixed, sta ble identity, either for She or the reader; all the same, we follow the heroine (non-heroine, non-character) as she moves from place to place, person to person, in an effort to locate her identity" (120).
Sharpley-Whiting's end discussion of what Francophone writers were saying during the nineteenth century is important because it is a call for interested scholars to do more work in revealing the "diversity of black female subjectivities rather than monolithic, homogenizing constructions of black femaleness.
The "moments of being" by which the subjectivities of these once-enslaved characters have been formed are told in "rememory," the active process by which a memory "comes back whether we want it to or not" (Beloved 14).