subjectivity


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subjectivity

the perspective of the person (subject); lack of objectivity. The range of attitudes towards this term indicates its essentially contentious nature. It is often used pejoratively within positivist sociology to derogate biased observation or methodology. At the other extreme it is celebrated by HERMENEUTICS as the only possible way to locate any attempts to theorize about the social. Any answer to the question as to whether subjectivity is inescapable or undesirable relies on ontological and epistemological assumptions about the nature of human beings’ relationship to the concrete world. In practice the two terms are used as if they occupied ends of a continuum, greater or lesser degrees of subjectivity being claimed by various authors. Various attempts have been made to illustrate the way that subjectivities are objectively constructed and vice versa (see PARSONS, ALTHUSSER, GIDDENS, for example), but the dichotomy stubbornly refuses to disappear.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ali Afshari (1995) studied the effects of subjectivity in first plan this research studied the performance changes , especially increasing in sale.
Ironically, what keeps the Enlightenment subject continually suspended at the moment of its deconstruction is the concern that any attempt to describe or chart its issue will install a new model of subjectivity as the end or result of a grand narrative of historical development.
It also briefly points out that the political adequacy of anti-Cartesian (post-Cartesian) subjectivity cannot be denied on the grounds that subjectivity as represented through the Cartesian Ego is done away with in an anti-Cartesian move.
On these terms, subjectivity is an epistemic condition set by the exteriority.
Both Fournier and Scarry are suggesting that subjectivity may be reduced by the 'ensnaring' capacity of pain; pain engulfs and empties subjectivities; we become 'nothing but a mass of hurting flesh' (Fournier 2002: 63).
With these strategies, she also manages to blur the line between the magical and the rational, the masculine and the feminine, so that the gendered and privileged Eurocentric subjectivity in which both Pynchon and Auster are trapped is disrupted.
Most importantly, though, Renov's book highlights documentary film and video "produced at the margins of commercial culture" (xvii), thereby increasing these films' visibility and connecting them to current trends in theories of subjectivity and political action.
It drew upon the history of social workers in the twentieth century, exploring the subjectivity of one group of professional, white collar workers as that class fraction emerged in relation to the social history of work, labor and ideology.
Listening to Reason: Culture, Subjectivity, and Nineteenth-Century Music.
they illustrate the relationship between the individual and society; they demonstrate how women negotiate their 'exceptional' gender status in their daily lives; and they make possible the examination of the links between the evolution of subjectivity and the development of female identity" (Bloom and Munro, 1995, p.
Eliminating subjectivity has required the use of image processing.