subjunctive

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Related to subjunctively: Present Subjunctive

subjunctive mood

The subjunctive mood refers to verbs that are used to describe hypothetical or non-real actions, events, or situations. This is in comparison to the indicative mood, which is used to express factual, non-hypothetical information.
We most commonly use the subjunctive mood to express desires or wishes; to express commands, suggestions, requests, or statements of necessity; or to describe hypothetical outcomes that depend on certain conditions.
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subjunctive:

see moodmood
or mode,
in verb inflection, the forms of a verb that indicate its manner of doing or being. In English the forms are called indicative (for direct statement or question or to express an uncertain condition, e.g.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The narrative she tries to construct for herself (and which emerges subjunctively into the narrative of Riceyman Steps as a whole) is one in which Henry is a man on whom she can rely and by whom she can allow herself to be mastered ("she experienced a sensuous pleasure in the passionate resolution to be his disciple and lieutenant" [148]).
If we read the conditionals definitive of the causal role subjunctively, then it is also implied that if the agent were in [C.
Finally rather than construct a narrative of these transformations based just on a dualistic bifurcation into dominating, external subjects (the Chinese, the corrupt PNG elite) and their captured, local objects (landowners and their resources), these processes can also be understood to be providing the landowners, or some of them at least, with the 'opportunity to live subjunctively as neither subject nor object of history but as both, at one and the same time' (Taussig, 1993:255).
Supposing the development is from [Beta] to a, # I is the move from speaking about `something else' to `something' (242a47), and #4 from speaking categorically to subjunctively.
For as we have seen, receptivity is to be understood subjunctively.