sublanguage

(redirected from sublanguages)
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sublanguage

(database, language)
One of the languages associated with a DBMS, for example a data-definition language or query language.
References in periodicals archive ?
A research group led by Jonathan Aldrich, associate professor in the Institute for Software Research (ISR), is developing a programming language called Wyvern that makes it possible to construct programs using a variety of targeted, domain-specific languages, such as SQL for querying databases or HTML for constructing Web pages, as sublanguages, rather than writing the entire program using a general purpose language.
The special languages described and endorsed by Morris and Korzybski suggest sublanguages or languages purposefully restricted to a special area--such as, science, poetry, or HCI (human-computer interaction).
The input texts can be the statements, questions, and commands from the sublanguages of English, Russian, and German.
Oma Keel" is issued twice a year; it publishes popular articles about linguistics and language maintenance, Estonian dialects and other sublanguages, etymologies, introductory articles about our linguists and language institutions, surveys of new literature concerning the Estonian language, chronology of language events, etc.
The aim is to explain and compare the share and dynamics of indirectal means of expression in literary Estonian based on the example of two sublanguages.
each of these sublanguages remain bound to their respective context.
For example, if the student chooses to decompose the language into two or three sublanguages, the resulting sublanguages will be quite simple, and therefore constructing a DFA for each will not be overly complicated.
For the most part, the data structures they used to represent knowledge were founded upon a referential theory of meaning; necessarily they were also limited to relatively small sublanguages or microworlds.
Computational linguists working in areas of natural language processing/language engineering have long realised the need to target the scope of their projects to very specific areas, and hence they talk about sublanguages such as air traffic control talk, journal articles on lipoprotein kinetics, navy telegraphic messages, weather reports, and aviation maintenance manuals.
Bakhtin (1986) typifies these sublanguages with his concept of the heteroglossia.
Bakhtin defines heteroglossia as the wide range of socioideological sublanguages that enter either common or literary discourse.
The input texts of this algorithm belong to the sublanguages of English, Russian, and German languages.