subsistence farming


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subsistence farming

[səb¦sis·təns ¦färm·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Growth of crops predominantly for consumption by the farm family rather than for sale.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 million of Namibia's total population of about 2 million depend on subsistence farming for their household food security.
This dependency may increase as a result of the promotion of export crops, such as cocoa and coffee, over subsistence farming.
Though most of them live off subsistence farming, social aid and cash from relatives working abroad, they would rather stay poor than run what they say is the risk of ruining their environment.
Protecting subsistence farming and inspiring new generations of farming is key to ensure sustainability and instigate change in the long term.
Land O Lakes helps farmers in developing countries move from subsistence farming to farming as a business, helping the private sector gain traction and grow a reliable customer base.
Teacher and project leader Steve Cheesbrough said: "In Malawi, without a good education, only basic, low paid work is available, or families have to support themselves through subsistence farming.
His grandparents worked the land and he has never forgotten the toil of subsistence farming.
iDE UK has a market-based philosophy where they support small-scale family farmers to move from subsistence farming to selling their produce for profit.
A Nigerian government spokesman, Onyekachi Eni, said Sunday that at least 50 people have been killed in Ebonyi in the eastern Nigeria following clashes between rival ethnic groups, the Ezza and Ezilo peoples due to a land dispute in an area where most of the people depend on subsistence farming for a living.
Because villagers in the region are dependent on dry-land subsistence farming, aggression resulting in damage to trees or crops or denial of access to agricultural lands constitutes a significant threat to the communities.
They will be able to get off subsistence farming and aspire to a better life only if we increase our investment in agricultural research and they have access to its fruits.
Summary: ABHA: Many women in southern Asir province have returned to subsistence farming in order to make ends meet.