subsistence farming


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subsistence farming

[səb¦sis·təns ¦färm·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Growth of crops predominantly for consumption by the farm family rather than for sale.
References in periodicals archive ?
With large numbers of households dependent on subsistence farming for survival in an arid environment with high rainfall variability, rural livelihoods in the flood prone regions are described as very unstable.
Rehabilitating state highways, which will provide basic rural connectivity, is a key step in opening up new economic opportunities for subsistence farming families, and other rural poor, as well as providing indirect benefits from improved access to health, education and other social services.
Summary: ABHA: Many women in southern Asir province have returned to subsistence farming in order to make ends meet.
There is much talk of technology transfers and helping African nations escape from the economic trap of subsistence farming, but this seductive discourse has been heard before.
Guard members with agriculture and civil engineering degrees, or with practical skills such as welding and animal husbandry are setting up demonstration farms, and helping Afghans go from subsistence farming to where they can earn extra money for their crops.
Both were caused by oppressive governments restricting the rights of individuals to own land and to trade: subsistence farming, combined with disease and bad weather, killed hundreds of thousands.
The dominance of subsistence farming has not helped, as it is clear that commercial large-scale farming is the way forward.
The former French colony, where militant group Al-Qaeda is active, is among the world's poorest countries with much of the population relying on subsistence farming and herding.
Most of the 600,000 population live by subsistence farming, animal husbandry and forestry.
For people who engage only in subsistence farming, which was long the economic mainstay of the African, Asian, and Latin American countryside, giving up a few hectares that yield little output in exchange for an unvarying conservation payment can be appealing, even if that payment is modest.
Subsistence farming, on the other hand, has always been a known means of survival here.
Through parables, Jesus asserts that the raw stuff of the daily life of the poor--debt bondage, subsistence farming, day labor pools, taxes, crop contamination, food preparation--is vital to understanding the reign of God, or as it says in Matthew, "the kingdom of heaven.