Substitution

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substitution

[‚səb·stə′tü·shən]
(psychology)
A defense mechanism whereby an unattainable or unacceptable goal, emotion, or object is replaced by one that is more attainable or acceptable.

Substitution

A material or process offered in lieu of, and equivalent to, the specified material or process.

Substitution

 

(law), in a will, the naming of a second heir, called a substitute heir. In Soviet law—for example, in Article 536 of the Civil Code of the RSFSR—a substitute heir can accede to an inheritance only if the first heir dies before the opening of the inheritance or does not accept the inheritance. In several other socialist countries, such as Hungary and Poland, legislation provides for substitution. In Poland, the law of inheritance allows substitution not only with respect to an heir ex testamento but also with respect to an heir ab intestato (art. 963 of the Civil Code).

substitution

A material or process offered in lieu of, and as being equivalent to, a specified material or process.

Substitution

Arsinoë
put her own son in place of Orestes; her son was killed and Orestes was saved. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 32]
Barabbas
robber freed in Christ’s stead. [N.T.: Matthew 27:15–18; Swed. Lit.: Barabbas]
Canty, Tom
young beggar takes to throne in prince’s stead. [Am. Lit.: The Prince and the Pauper]
Edward, Prince of Wales
kingling becomes urchin in clothing exchange. [Am. Lit.: The Prince and the Pauper]
George, Tobey
after Marcus’s death, replaces him in his family. [Am. Lit.: The Human Comedy]
Hagar
thinking herself barren, Sarah offers slave to Abraham. [O.T.: Genesis 16:1–4]
Leah
deceptively substituted for Rachel in Jacob’s bed. [O.T.: Genesis 29:22–25]
whipping boy
surrogate sufferer for delinquent prince. [Eur. Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 942]
References in periodicals archive ?
The medieval and Reformation periods were haunted by the anxiety of guilt and condemnation, and the substitutionary atonement theory provided a means to remove that guilt and condemnation, displacing it onto the suffering Christ, who appeased the mighty wrath of a just God on behalf of fallen humanity.
Similarly, Jeffery Weiss in his review of The Deathly Hallows notes specifically that Harry's death suggests a strong parallel to the Christian notion of substitutionary atonement because he suffers on behalf of his friends, even of the whole wizarding world, to bring about the defeat of Voldemort.
If accepted by the court, the lawyer's sacrifice is fully substitutionary and removes the legal guilt and liability otherwise attributable to the client.
Well, because this was already a substitutionary sacrifice - Jesus dying in my stead, and yours.
The survival of these substitutionary rituals in the face of stiff prophetic opposition to all forms of child sacrifice testifies to the tenacity of the conceptual basis of the practice in ancient Israel (and rabbinic Judaism as well).
Yes, there are seeds of what is still the most common interpretation, substitutionary atonement or penal substitution.
Stanhope, a successful local playwright, eventually leads his acquaintance, Pauline, in a didactic explanation of how loving people in a substitutionary way actuates coinherence.
Winchester continued throughout the remainder of his life to preach the doctrines of revelation, the trinity [sic], the divinity of Christ, the substitutionary atonement, the importance and necessity of the resurrection, and the second coming in which Christ would finally overcome the world.
The relationships are all noted to be either nil or substitutionary (as opposed to complementary).
Since he was punished in our place, Jesus substituted himself for us, and died a penal, substitutionary death--thus substitutionary atonement.
However, if a substitutionary relationship holds, the domestic production is hollowed out and it is less likely to improve the product quality at home.
But substitutionary atonement need not be taken that way: the dative in "he died for us" is open to redemptive inflection.