subtend


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subtend

[səb′tend]
(botany)
To lie adjacent to and below another structure, often enclosing it.
(mathematics)
A line segment or an arc of a circle subtends an angle with vertex at a specified point if the end points of the line segment or arc lie on the sides of the angle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Any reticle subtends a certain angle at certain ranges.
The outer circle subtends 18 inches at 50 yards and the inner circle subtends 18 inches at 100 yards.
Assume each bar in my example subtends 2" at 100 yards (see side bar).
Multiply that times the distance, so at 500 yards the horizontal cross hair and the second range bar would just subtend 25 inches--about the shoulder-to-brisket measurement of an elk.
The archetypal inflorescence in Hydrocharitaceae seems to be a long internode surmounted by a terminal flower above two bracts, which probably subtend lateral structures (Kaul, 1970), while the stolon of Hydrocharis (Posluszny & Charlton, 1999), Limnobium (Wilder, I 974b), and Stratiotes.
Using a bit of math allows us to calculate how much an MOA subtends at 100 yards.
The Jewish general, writing from the comforts of Rome after his defeat by or surrender to the Roman army, meticulously applied rhetorical devices and consciously allowed the penetration of emotions to his historical writing, she argues, thus creating highly-charged accounts whose themes and rhetorical tricks often seem to subtend the particular story of Herod to more universal interests.
In either case, one would need to consider the social politics of this mapping procedure, taking care to cast a cold eye on the Utopian claims about online social media, which all too often subtend net-based forms of power.
Consequently, Barre can exploit this figure/ground relationship without the attendant conjuring of illusionistic play, and without recourse to depth--either the pictorial effect or the metaphysics routinely assumed to subtend it.
The contortions of the "Lynch Fragments" give allusive form to the grisly histories that subtend their eponymous leitmotif: the "strange fruit" of jagged edges and fused joints, of things bound and lashed.
But hers is a play of narrative as much as of process, and the theories that ostensibly subtend each image--and often provide its fancifully depicted subjects--are romantically elaborated or wholly improvised, and, at their best, epiphanic.
Going a little further, you could postulate that these traces are left there to offer up a record of the hesitancy and contingency that subtend the clarity and precision of the drawings themselves.