subtractive synthesis


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subtractive synthesis

[səb‚trak·tiv ′sin·thə·səs]
(engineering acoustics)
A method of synthesizing musical tones, in which an electronic circuit produces a standard waveform (such as a sawtooth wave), which contains a very large number of harmonics at known relative amplitudes, and this circuit is followed by a variety of electric or electronic filters to convert the basic tone signals into the desired musical waveforms.
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This standard defines colour combinations for subtractive synthesis and is not optimised for any printing process in particular but is robust enough for all general uses like classic offset CMYK print.
For objective evaluation of print quality, ANSI values were measured on samples of different combinations of colour values for subtractive synthesis.
For testing, two test forms of which the first is made so that in the background there are 4 different colours: cyan, yellow, magenta and black, in the value of 100%, where the first three represent the basic colours of subtractive synthesis and also 4 primary colours that are used in the classical offset printing.
The module entitled "Sound Synthesis" contains tracks about additive synthesis, subtractive synthesis, non-linear synthesis, and, curiously, a history of computer music.
Changes that occur with editing of portrait photographs are however higher for some primary colours of additive and subtractive synthesis (Table 4), especially at high ISO speed (most for the C, R, G and B at photographs taken with ISO 3200/36 and what is highest for R where is the colour difference between shot and edited photographs higher from the border acceptability ([DELTA][E.
For shot photograph L, a and b values for standard skin colours and primary colours of additive and subtractive synthesis were determined by using Adobe Photoshop CS3 and colour differences ([DELTA][E.