sucker


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to sucker: gloating, onboard, marking, misconception

sucker,

common name for members of the family Catostomidae, freshwater fish related to the minnowsminnow,
common name for the Cyprinidae, a large family of freshwater fish which includes the carp (Cyprinus carpio), and of which there are some 2,400 species. Minnows have soft-rayed fins and teeth in the throat only.
..... Click the link for more information.
. Like minnows and the less closely related catfishescatfish,
common name applied to members of the fish families constituting the order Siluriformes, found in fresh and coastal waters. Catfish are named for the barbels ("whiskers") around their mouths and have scaleless skins, fleshy, rayless posterior fins, and sharp defensive
..... Click the link for more information.
, the suckers possess an intricate set of bones forming a highly sensitive hearing apparatus. Suckers range in size from 6 in. (15 cm) to 3 ft (90 cm). They have fleshy, sucking mouths and are sluggish bottom feeders, eating small aquatic animals and plants. The white, or common, sucker, found throughout North America, is an important food fish with firm, sweet (though bony) flesh. Buffalo fish are large suckers whose coarse, bony, nutritious flesh is also much used as food in the central states. The bigmouth buffalo fish reaches 4 ft (120 cm) in length and 65 lb (29 kg) in weight, the smallmouth buffalo fish sometimes attains 20 lb (9 kg), and the black, or mongrel, buffalo fish is intermediate in size. Other suckers are known as red horses, carp suckers, and freshwater mullets. Suckers are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
..... Click the link for more information.
, subphylum Vertebrata, class Actinopterygii, order Cypriniformes, family Catostomidae.

Sucker

 

(also, watershoot or water sprout), a shoot on the trunk or a thick branch of a tree that develops from dormant buds. Its leaves are larger than those of other shoots. Suckers are formed when a tree freezes, is pruned, or is given better lighting (for example, when neighboring trees are cut down). They are found frequently on oaks, maples, elms, black pop-lars, and Lombardy poplars. In fruit-bearing trees the suckers are usually destroyed because their growth decreases the number of flower buds, thereby decreasing also the fruit yield.

sucker

[′sək·ər]
(botany)
A shoot that develops rapidly from the lower portion of a plant, and usually at the expense of the plant.
(zoology)
A disk-shaped organ in various animals for adhering to or holding onto an individual, usually of another species.

sucker

A shoot rising from a subterranean root or stem of a plant.

sucker

1. a young animal that is not yet weaned, esp a suckling pig
2. Zoology an organ that is specialized for sucking or adhering
3. a cup-shaped device, generally made of rubber, that may be attached to articles allowing them to adhere to a surface by suction
4. Botany
a. a strong shoot that arises in a mature plant from a root, rhizome, or the base of the main stem
b. a short branch of a parasitic plant that absorbs nutrients from the host
5. a pipe or tube through which a fluid is drawn by suction
6. any small mainly North American cyprinoid fish of the family Catostomidae, having toothless jaws and a large sucking mouth
7. any of certain fishes that have sucking discs, esp the clingfish or sea snail
8. a piston in a suction pump or the valve in such a piston
References in classic literature ?
He caught hold of the rock with both hands and clung to it groaning with pain till the wave retired, so he was saved that time; but presently the wave came on again and carried him back with it far into the sea--tearing his hands as the suckers of a polypus are torn when some one plucks it from its bed, and the stones come up along with it--even so did the rocks tear the skin from his strong hands, and then the wave drew him deep down under the water.
But hardly were the screws loosed, when the panel rose with great violence, evidently drawn by the suckers of a poulp's arm.
The unhappy man, seized by the tentacle and fixed to the suckers, was balanced in the air at the caprice of this enormous trunk.
Here are a good thousand of the shiners, some hundreds of suckers, and a powerful quantity of other fry.
On the 20th of August, 1672, at one o'clock, Cornelius was therefore in his dry-room, with his feet resting on the foot-bar of the table, and his elbows on the cover, looking with intense delight on three suckers which he had just detached from the mother bulb, pure, perfect, and entire, and from which was to grow that wonderful produce of horticulture which would render the name of Cornelius van Baerle for ever illustrious.
I shall find the black tulip," said Cornelius to himself, whilst detaching the suckers.
You-all laugh at quicksilver in the riffles and think flour gold was manufactured by God Almighty for the express purpose of fooling suckers and chechaquos.
By means of their long arms and suckers, they could drag their bodies into very narrow crevices; and when thus fixed, it required great force to remove them.
They are similar to those found in rivers; but as there are no suckers nor lampreys here, I know not by what fish they could be made.
What are these suckers of cigars and swallowers of strong drinks, whose hats and legs we see in every possible variety of twist, doing, but amusing themselves?
Lilacs sometimes sucker and you're as well to remove suckering growth - pulling it away rather than chopping it off.
The razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) is a large, riverine catostomid endemic to the Colorado River Basin.