summer


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summer

1
1. 
a. the warmest season of the year, between spring and autumn, astronomically from the June solstice to the September equinox in the N hemisphere and at the opposite time of year in the S hemisphere
b. (as modifier): summer flowers
2. the period of hot weather associated with the summer

summer

2
1. a large horizontal beam or girder, esp one that supports floor joists
2. another name for lintel
3. a stone on the top of a column, pier, or wall that supports an arch or lintel

summer

[′səm·ər]
(astronomy)
The period from the summer solstice to the autumnal equinox; popularly and for most meteorological purposes, it is taken to include June through August in the Northern Hemisphere, and December through February in the Southern Hemisphere.

springer, skewback, summer

springer, 1: S
1. The impost or place where the vertical support for an arch

summer

summer, 4: S
1. A horizontal beam supporting the ends of floor joists or resting on posts and supporting the wall above; also called a summertree.
2. Any large timber or beam which serves as a bearing surface.
3. The lintel of a door or window; a breastsummer.
4. A stone laid on a column and serving as a support for construction above, as in the construction of an arch.

Summer

Aestas
personification of summer; portrayed as youthful and sprightly. [Rom. Myth.: LLEI, I: 322]
Ceres
goddess of the season. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 130]
cricket
symbol of summer; weather prognosticator. [Insect Symbolism: Jobes, 382]
naked girl with fruit
personification of summer. [Art: Hall, 130]
sickle and sheaf of corn
representational of the season. [Art: Hall, 129]

SUMMER

String manipulation and pattern matching language by Klint & Sint at CWI in the late 1970s. It was recently used as the input and implementation language for the Dataflow Compiler Project at CWI.

["An Overview of the SUMMER Programming Language", Paul Klint, 7th POPL, ACM 1980, pp. 47-55].
References in classic literature ?
When the rumble of the evening train that took away the express cars loaded with the day's harvest of berries had passed and restored the silence of the summer night, he went again to walk upon the veranda.
He was spending his summer vacation, as he always did, with his mother at Grand Isle.
Where roaring on the ledges the summer ground-swell rolled; I heard them lift the chorus that drowned the breakers' song-- The Beaches of Lukannon--two million voices strong.
In summer the boy always lay out in the sun, while the girl hid herself in the cellar: so it happened that the brother and sister came very little into contact with each other--in fact, they carefully avoided it.
Night came again, and the fire-flies flew; But the bud let them pass, and drank of the dew; While the soft stars shone, from the still summer heaven, On the happy little flower that had learned the lesson given.
When the weather began to grow cool, Grandfather's chair had been removed from the summer parlor into a smaller and snugger room.
I doubt whether Eustace did not internally pronounce the whole thing a bore, until I led him to my predecessor's little ruined, rustic summer house, midway on the hillside.
Twas sunset: when the sun will part There comes a sullenness of heart To him who still would look upon The glory of the summer sun.
with a partition between); both of good state and bigness; and those not to go all the length, but to have at the further end, a winter and a summer parlor, both fair.
Or perhaps the summer fog was more general, and the meadows lay like a white sea, out of which the scattered trees rose like dangerous rocks.
A number of ladies in summer dresses and gentlemen in grey frock-coats and tall hats stood on the lawn or sat upon the benches; and every now and then a slender girl in starched muslin would step from the tent, bow in hand, and speed her shaft at one of the targets, while the spectators interrupted their talk to watch the result.
Even at ten o'clock, when the Rostovs got out of their carriage at the chapel, the sultry air, the shouts of hawkers, the light and gay summer clothes of the crowd, the dusty leaves of the trees on the boulevard, the sounds of the band and the white trousers of a battalion marching to parade, the rattling of wheels on the cobblestones, and the brilliant, hot sunshine were all full of that summer languor, that content and discontent with the present, which is most strongly felt on a bright, hot day in town.