superjacent waters

superjacent waters

[¦sü·pər′jā·sənt ′wȯd·ərz]
(oceanography)
The waters above the continental shelf.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Second, according to international law including UNCLOS, a coastal state's rights over the continental shelf do not affect the legal status of the superjacent waters or of the air space above those waters, nor do they affect foreign ships' navigation freedom in the coastal state's EEZ and on the high seas, or their innocent passage through the coastal state's territorial sea as supported by international law,' he added.
In 1995, on the basis of a judgment rendered in 1993 by the International Court of Justice, Denmark and Norway delimited the continental shelf and the superjacent waters between Greenland and Jan Mayen.
section] 7(3) to consider whether the special territorial jurisdiction addressed therein can reach alleged criminal conduct on the continental shelf or in superjacent waters beyond a U.
26) Because the United States does not have "territorial jurisdiction" under international law over conduct occurring on the continental shelf or in superjacent waters beyond its territorial seas, the United States has no jurisdiction to enforce a federal law regarding such conduct that rests merely on the principle of subjective territorial jurisdiction.
Although this essay has focused on the lack of subjective territorial jurisdiction of the United States over an outer continental shelf and superjacent waters and why 18 U.
200) Secondly, Finn J addressed native title rights of taking marine resources from the superjacent waters in the EEZ and found that they too raised 'no issue of inconsistency for the common law.
The UN Conference on the Law of the Sea 1958, and subsequently the UNCLOS, describe the continental shelf as "the seabed and subsoil of the submarine areas adjacent to the coast but outside the area of the territorial sea, to a depth of 200 meters, or, beyond that limit, to where the depth of the superjacent waters admits of the exploitation of the natural resources of the said areas.
in resolving a maritime border dispute," the treaty established a JDZ covering an area of approximately 35,000 square kilometers that includes the "seabed, subsoil and the superjacent waters thereof.
The Convention on the Continental Shelf says that the term refers: (i) to the seabed and subsoil of the submarine areas adjacent to the coast but outside the area of the territorial sea, to a depth of 200 metres or, beyond that limit, to where the depth of the superjacent waters admits of the exploration of the natural resources of the said areas; (ii) to the seabed and subsoil of similar submarine areas adjacent to the coasts of islands'.
the seabed and subsoil of the submarine areas adjacent to the coast but outside the area of the territorial sea, to a depth of 200 meters or, beyond that limit, to where the depth of the superjacent waters admits of the exploitation of the natural resources of the said areas.
subsoil under the continental shelf regime and the superjacent waters up
be extended where the depth of the superjacent waters admits the