supination


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supination

[‚sü·pə′nā·shən]
(anatomy)
Turning the palm upward.
Inversion of the foot.
(control systems)
The orientation and motion of a robot component with its front or unprotected side facing upward and exposed.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Under coordinated control from the microprocessor, the peak angular velocities for the first prototype wrist were pronation and supination (250 [degrees][s.
The K-wire was not removed in two patients because of no limitation of pronation and supination in these patients.
Both patients initiated immediate treatment with etoricoxib selective COX-2 (Celebrex 200 mg, Tauxib 90 mg) for 2 months and, after an initial period of immobility of around ten days to allow proper healing of the wound, were subjected to intense rehabilitation treatment and the use of splinting in alternating maximum pronation or supination positions, in order to restore the full range of movement (Figure 6).
However, the Level group showed only supination of various degrees during FSFCP.
Supination and pronation of the affected wrist was significantly diminished compared to the contralateral wrist.
The forearm is held in supination and the elbow is flexed between 45[degrees] and 90[degrees].
For wrist rotation, we used only the data for wrist supination, wrist pronation, and no movement to build and test the LDA classifier.
Effect of pronation and supination orthosis on Morton's neuroma and lower extremity function.
In an open kinetic chain, pronation and supination are possible in the foot around the axis that lies along the center line of the foot.
By Week 6, as a percentage of the intact side, the experimental group had 12% (95% CI 7 to 17) more power grip strength, 24% (95% CI 17 to 32) more pinch grip strength, 15% (95% CI 7 to 23) more key grip strength, 26% (95% CI 15 to 37) more supination strength, 8% (95% CI 3 to 13) more flexion/extension range of motion, and 14% (95% CI 5 to 22) more supination/pronation range of motion than the control group.
Common biomechanical factors leading to injury include both excessive pronation and supination of the foot, both normal motions of the foot.
There will be soft tissue swelling, visualized on a supination anterior-posterior x-ray.