sweet sorghum


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sweet sorghum

[‚swēt ′sȯr·gəm]
(agriculture)
Sorghum bicolor. A crop plant grown primarily for syrup production and for forage.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Zhang SJ, Chaudhry AS, Osman A, et al Associative effects of ensiling mixtures of sweet sorghum and alfalfa on nutritive value, fermentation and methane characteristics.
2011), where these authors report that ethephon alters SS in sweet sorghum cultivars.
Vermerris W, Rainbolt C, Wright D, Newman Y (2008) 'Production of biofuel crops in Florida: Sweet sorghum.
2012) studied BR 505 and CMSXS647 sweet sorghum in Patos de Minas/MG and Sete Lagoas/MG, respectively, under different plant arrangements, and also found that the highest fresh biomass yields were observed in the 0,5m row spacing, but did not find influence on yield when altering the plant population (80,000 to 140,000 plants [ha.
Although sweet sorghum varieties have important agronomic traits and invaluable economic values the high sugar metabolism- related genes have been little known so far.
Demand for sorghum syrup has doubled during the last five years, says James Baier, executive secretary of the National Sweet Sorghum Producers and Processors Association, rising so fast that some of his 300 members have begun running out before the new season starts.
Sweet sorghum is reportedly a hardy crop that can extend the ethanol production season by up to 60 days in Brazil.
There are at least 30 named varieties of sweet sorghum cane, the more common of which include Ames Amber, Dale, Della, Honey Drip, Mennonite, Rox Orange, and Sand Mountain.
Intercropping of legumes with sweet sorghum for higher forage production .
Sorghum includes at least four groups of cultivated plants: grain sorghum; sweet sorghum for forage; Sudan grass for pasture, hay and silage; and broom corn for making brooms.
Similar to sugarcane, the juice from harvested sweet sorghum stalks can be converted into ethanol using currently available, conventional fermentation technology (smith et al.