switching theory

switching theory

[′swich·iŋ ‚thē·ə·rē]
(electronics)
The theory of circuits made up of ideal digital devices; included are the theory of circuits and networks for telephone switching, digital computing, digital control, and data processing.
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The prehistory of cybernetics that results in the problematic history of the development of digital logic, including Boolean algebra, gates that process logic signals, switching theory, flip-flops and memory elements that store logic signals and in general the representation of binary information in physical systems.
See Burris (2013) on "The Algebra of Logic Tradition;" O'Regan (2008) on the history of computing; and Stankovic and Astola (2011) on switching theory.
Leonard Kleinrock of MIT published the first paper on packet switching theory in July 1961 [5].
Roberts' ARPANET translated Kleinrock's innovative packet switching theory into a practical, working network for the first time.
Its intellectual substance goes well beyond the mathematics of numerical analysis, switching theory, computability theory, and programming languages [2].