Syllepsis


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Related to Syllepsis: synecdoche, syphilis

Syllepsis

 

(also called zeugma), a stylistic device consisting of the union of disparate terms in a common syntactic or semantic unit. An example of syllepsis with syntactic dissimilarity is “We love glory, we love to drown our dissipated intellect in drink” (A. S. Pushkin). This example unites direct objects which are expressed by a noun and an infinitive. An example of syllepsis with phraseological dissimilarity is I. A. Krylov’s line “The scandalmonger’s eyes and teeth flashed,” which combines the phrase “eyes flashed” with the extraneous word “teeth.” An example of syllepsis with semantic dissimilarity is “Filled with sounds and confusion” (A. S. Pushkin), which describes an emotional state and its cause. In elevated literary style, syllepsis gives an impression of nervous carelessness, and in low style it has a comic effect (“the rains and two students came”).

References in periodicals archive ?
He also returns to Riffaterre's concept of syllepsis to explain the contraries and failures of art severed from reality, and to connect O'Brien's aesthetics to the metafictional sensibility of postmodernism.
Which is why when Bob Hicok, employs, for example, a form of zeugma called syllepsis (let's see if I can define this: when a word in a sentence breaks the syntactical and semantic rules of order in relation to other words in or sections of the sentence, so the delivery of meaning is disrupted; yikes.
These decisions are especially pertinent when a syllepsis, or "a word interpretable in two senses," is involved because it compels the translator to choose and, in so doing, develop an interpretive perspective vis-a-vis the translation (38).
Chapter four, "Angles: The Heroic Frenzies," explores the usage of various tropes (oxymoron, syneciosis, syllepsis, and epadanos, to name a few) in Bruno's De gli eroici furori.
My essay 'Deconstruction and Zionism: Jacques Derrida's Specters of Marx', focuses upon related concerns, especially the syllepsis, or figural-literal doubling, of the terms messianicity and Abrahamic messianism in Specters of Marx.
I propose now to read this fragment along the lines suggested by Riffaterre as a subtext -- the hermeneutic model and extended metaphor of At Swim-Two-Birds and Trellis's pun acting within it as syllepsis, an intertextual link, con necting O'Brien's novel to an analogous passage in Finnegans wake.
Bradstreet's depiction of a "goodly river's side" refers, by way of syllepsis, to Christ's pierced side, from which issued the water of life, while Spenser telescopes Christ, cross, and tree to achieve a cognate allusive force.