Syllepsis

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Syllepsis

 

(also called zeugma), a stylistic device consisting of the union of disparate terms in a common syntactic or semantic unit. An example of syllepsis with syntactic dissimilarity is “We love glory, we love to drown our dissipated intellect in drink” (A. S. Pushkin). This example unites direct objects which are expressed by a noun and an infinitive. An example of syllepsis with phraseological dissimilarity is I. A. Krylov’s line “The scandalmonger’s eyes and teeth flashed,” which combines the phrase “eyes flashed” with the extraneous word “teeth.” An example of syllepsis with semantic dissimilarity is “Filled with sounds and confusion” (A. S. Pushkin), which describes an emotional state and its cause. In elevated literary style, syllepsis gives an impression of nervous carelessness, and in low style it has a comic effect (“the rains and two students came”).

References in periodicals archive ?
These branches are ephemeral, but, as in the sylleptic systems, other branches that develop proleptically may be persistent.
Not all ephemeral branches are strictly reproductive and sylleptic.
Again, simple inflorescences are those that have no sylleptic branching, no modification in duration of branches, and no shoot dimorphism: the inflorescence consists entirely of unit inflorescences (singly, paired, or fasciculate) distributed along nodes of the axis of the RGU.
The derived state, in which branching is sylleptic as well as proleptic (char.
In the clade including the Abarema alliance and Pith ecellobium, vegetative branching becomes sylleptic (char.
Branching: 0 = sylleptic and proleptic; 1 = proleptic only.