synaptic vesicle

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Related to synaptic: Synaptic transmission

synaptic vesicle

[si¦nap·tik ′ves·ə·kəl]
(neuroscience)
A small membrane-bound structure in the axon terminals of nerve cells that contains neurotransmitters and releases them by exocytosis when an action potential reaches the terminal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Synaptic Business Automation expresses an ideal state for a business whereby the synthesising of data, systems, organisations, knowledge, and supply chains adds value and strengthens competitiveness.
Its patented ESP technology produces rapid, high-information read-outs of synaptic networks from in-vivo/in-vitro/ex-vivo preparations.
The Synaptic Corporation and 4000PRO are either registered trademarks or trademarks of The Synaptic Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.
Synaptic pruning is probably not the only thing that matters for schizophrenia, Nasrallah cautions.
Synaptic transmission, the essential process in brain physiological functions, is critical in the signal integration activities of the central nervous system (CNS).
At excitatory synapses, AP generation in postsynaptic neurons and ensuing propagation in neuronal circuitry is determined primarily by the EPsC amplitude, representing synaptic strength,
2011), and N-glycosylation sites in the extracellular loop domain that confer either constitutive or activity-dependent synaptic delivery (Storey et at.
AT&T Synaptic Storage as a Service allows federal agencies to securely store, distribute, and retrieve data on-demand.
The study provides an important proof of principle that functional motor circuits can be created outside the body using these neurons and cells and that the level of communication, or synaptic activity, between them can be accurately measured by stimulating the motor neurons with an electrode and then tracking the transfer of electrical activity into the muscle cells to which the neurons are connected.
They looked at the connections, or synapses, which control cognitive function, and the way they change in strength and properties - known as synaptic plasticity.
When we're born, most of the major functional subregions of the brain and their interconnections are in place, but various experiences and environmental exposures affect which synaptic connections become stronger and which become weaker.
of California-Irvine) explores new insights into human origins, migrations, and human population diversity gained through genomic analysis; and into the etiology of common diseases such as diabetes coronary heart disease; and synaptic plasticity.