syndicalism

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Related to syndicalist: Anarcho-syndicalist

syndicalism

(sĭn`dĭkəlĭzəm), political and economic doctrine that advocates control of the means and processes of production by organized bodies of workers. Like anarchists, syndicalists believe that any form of state is an instrument of oppression and that the state should be abolished. Viewing the trade union as the essential unit of production, they believe that it should be the basic organizational unit of society. To achieve their aims, syndicalists advocate direct industrial action, e.g., the general strikegeneral strike,
sympathetic cessation of work by a majority of the workers in all industries of a locality or nation. Such a stoppage is economic if it is for the purpose of redressing some grievance or pressing upon the employer a series of economic demands.
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, sabotagesabotage
[Fr., sabot=wooden shoe; hence, to work clumsily], form of direct action by workers against employers through obstruction of work and/or lowering of plant efficiency. Methods range from peaceful slowing of production to destruction of property.
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, slowdowns, and other means of disrupting the existing system of production. They eschew political action as both corruptive and self-defeating. The writings of Pierre Joseph ProudhonProudhon, Pierre Joseph
, 1809–65, French social theorist. Of a poor family, Proudhon won an education through scholarships. Much of his later life was spent in poverty. He achieved prominence through his pamphlet What Is Property? (1840, tr.
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, with his attacks on property, and of Georges SorelSorel, Georges
, 1847–1922, French social philosopher. An engineer before he devoted himself to writing, Sorel found in the political and social life of bourgeois democracy the triumph of mediocrity and espoused various forms of socialism, chiefly revolutionary syndicalism.
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, who espoused violence, have influenced syndicalist doctrine. Syndicalism, like anarchismanarchism
[Gr.,=having no government], theory that equality and justice are to be sought through the abolition of the state and the substitution of free agreements between individuals.
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, has flourished largely in Latin countries, especially in France, where trade unionism was for years strongly influenced by syndicalist programs. Syndicalism began a steady decline after World War I as a result of competition from Communist unions, government suppression, and internal splits between the revolutionary anarcho-syndicalists and moderate reformers. In the United States the chief organization of the syndicalist type was the Industrial Workers of the WorldIndustrial Workers of the World
(IWW), revolutionary industrial union organized in Chicago in 1905 by delegates from the Western Federation of Mines, which formed the nucleus of the IWW, and 42 other labor organizations.
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, which flourished early in the 20th cent. but was virtually extinguished after World War I.

Bibliography

See F. F. Ridley, Revolutionary Syndicalism in France (1970).

syndicalism

see ANARCHO-SYNDICALISM.

syndicalism

1. a revolutionary movement and theory advocating the seizure of the means of production and distribution by syndicates of workers through direct action, esp a general strike
2. an economic system resulting from such action
References in periodicals archive ?
It was arguably--along with centres like Havana, Paris, Tokyo, and Johannesburg--(6) one of the key hubs in global anarchist and syndicalist networks.
Radical Unionism: The Rise and Fall of Revolutionary Syndicalism" is deftly organized into two major sections: 'Dynamics of the Syndicalist Movement' and 'The Transition to Communism'.
Brookfield's early life in England and his first years in Australia are covered in a few pages and the sources used are Brookfield's public utterances or the recollections of his friend and fellow syndicalist, Ern Wetherell, who worked in the mines from 13 years of age, became a journalist on the union-owned Barrier Daily Truth and later MLA for Cobar.
1) The default consequence of these changes was a more aggressive pursuit of class politics, the use of syndicalist methods by sections of the workforce, and the rejection of negotiation by employers who saw themselves as being outside the political system.
Mainwaring, who died in 1971, wrote The Miners' Next Step, a syndicalist manifesto suggesting how ownership and control of the coal pits should change.
You just mentioned the syndicalist classic, The Miners' Next Step.
On the one hand, as its Futurist and more fervent Syndicalist supporters argued, Fascism was to proclaim a revolutionary fresh start and ignore the past for the future.
The syndicalist phase of American unionism appeared to have come to an end, and organized labor turned its attention to the public sector, where different economic and historical factors obtained.
The CEB helped to crush the operations of the IWW, the American syndicalist organisation that opposed World War I.
Of course, there was also an alternative internationalism to be found in this period in such radical proletarian formations as the International Workers of the World, and the global syndicalist tradition--a tradition that largely went down to defeat.
Indeed, several political movements fought for equal rights and independence in the twentieth century: radical nationalists with L'Etoile Nord Africaine, which later became Le Parti du Peuple Algerien under the leadership of former syndicalist Messali Hadj; liberals with Ferhat Abbas; and even communists with Le Parti Communiste Algerien.
Later, his politics would lurch to the syndicalist right; but his manifesto-like writings from the 1920s were so striking and fresh that he was an overnight sensation.

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