SYN

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Related to syne: auld lang syne

syn

[sin]
(organic chemistry)
In stereochemistry, on the same side of a reference plane; for example, the stereochemical outcome of an addition reaction where the new bonds are on the same side of the original pi bond is called syn addition.

SYN

On drawings, abbr. for “synthetic.”

SYN

(character)

SYN

(language)
A syntactic specification language for COPS.

["Metalanguages of the Compiler Production System COPS", J. Borowiec, in GI Fachgesprach "Compiler-Compiler", ed W. Henhapl, Tech Hochs Darmstadt 1978, pp. 122-159].
References in periodicals archive ?
Lorraine wrote on Twitter: "FFS @piersmorgan - Auld Lang Syne could not BE more Scottish
Auld Lang Syne was originally a poem written in Scots by Robert Burns in 1788 - although it is believed he collected some of the verses rather than wrote them from scratch himself.
com/music/2017/01/01/mariah-carey-new-years-eve-technical-issues/) something was amiss in the performance while Carey was singing "Auld Lang Syne," but when it came to the second song, "Emotions," Carey appeared to be confused since her earpiece wasn't working properly.
Flower of Scotland could be the sporting anthem, Freedom Come All Ye could be the formal one for political events and Auld Lang Syne could just be our national song to be played at all other occasions.
For Auld Lang Syne, my dear For Auld Lang Syne We'll make next year the best one yet For Auld Lang Syne
Once everyone has had their fill of food and whisky, there will be a toast to Burns followed by a 'toast to the lassies', which would include poking a bit of fun, and will be followed by a 'toast to the laddies', various other toasts and finally Auld Lang Syne.
KARAOKE fans rejected the traditional sentiments of Auld Lang Syne this New Year and saw in 2013 Gangnam Style, according to a poll.
Poems like A red red rose and Auld lang syne inspired and enriched our sensibilities.
Reporter ANDREW PAIN looks at how people will be mumbling and miming their way through Auld Lang Syne tonight.
THREE quarters of Britons will mime or make up the words to Auld Lang Syne on New Year's Eve, according to a poll.
Commenting on the theme of old friendship, Burns mentions in his letter "the Scots phrase, 'Auld lang syne,'" which translates as "old time's sake.
Prancing around the street banging saucepans with your wooden spoons doing a frenzied version of the hokey cokey to the tune ofAuld Lang Syne .