syntactic

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Related to syntactically: syntaxes

syntactic

Dealing with language rules (syntax). See syntax.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of recursively applying the list function on its constitutive units obviously undermines the clarity of the catalogue both syntactically and cognitively.
Mark Twain Donald Rumsfeld was laughed at when he made the comment quoted above, but he was syntactically and semantically correct.
But again, he writes, "What makes a representation pictorial or diagrammatic is not how we perceive it, but how it relates to others, syntactically and semantically within a system of representation.
Instead, the poem offers "But fate is," a syntactically complete but semantically empty formulation--the sort of High Non-Sense in which Stevens specialized--that echoes feebly in the linebreak blankness.
I thought about that short ride off and on all the next day: Both hands on the wheel, the slight turn of her head, the unfolding, semantically and syntactically elaborated conversation about making a living in Las Vegas.
Subjects were given 280 experimental sentences, including some that were syntactically (grammatically) correct and others containing grammatical errors, such as "We drank Lisa's brandy by the fire in the lobby," or "We drank Lisa's by brandy the fire in the lobby.
Basically, the former are syntactically dominated by one of the lowest syntactic (grammatical) categories, namely, noun, adjective, verb; while the latter, on the contrary, cannot be described like that.
Besides varying the characters' voices lexically, Pasternak individualized them phonetically, intonationally, rhythmically, and syntactically.
Academic writing is usually dense, syntactically complex, verbose, and jargon-laden: Stylistically, it is the antithesis of usable dialogue design.
More precisely, indexicals are syntactically akin to logical variables.
On the face of it, language seems to have little to do with domestication one way or the other, but Johnson's suggestion is intriguing: the hierarchical structure of lupine society provided the necessary model for the hierarchical organization of syntactically complex language (75).
Similarly, it avoids the "sentence-scrubbers-for-foreign-students" stigma that Thonus describes (13); just as writing centers seek to improve writers and not just papers, this method is used to improve nonnative speakers' ability to form syntactically and idiomatically valid phrases, not just fix individual instances.