syrinx


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syrinx:

see panpipespanpipes,
 Pandean pipes
, or syrinx
, musical wind instrument, consisting of graduated tubes closed at one end and fastened together. The player holds the instrument vertically and blows into the open end of the tube; each tube has its own pitch.
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syrinx

[′sir·iŋks]
(paleontology)
A tube surrounding the pedicle in certain fossil brachiopods.
(vertebrate zoology)
The vocal organ in birds.

syrinx

In ancient Egypt, a narrow and deep rock-cut channel or tunnel forming a characteristic feature of Egyptian tombs of the New Empire.

Syrinx

transformed into reeds which pursuing Pan made into pipe. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 232; Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]
See: Music

Syrinx

nymph, pursued by Pan, was changed into a reed, from which Pan made his pipes. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 876]
References in periodicals archive ?
Placed amid two pillars of musical Romanticism, Debussy's abstract language makes an especially powerful impression: in just over three minutes, Syrinx says as much as some pieces do in an hour.
The syrinx, located at the point where the trachea splits in two to send air to the lungs, is unique to birds and performs the same function as vocal cords in humans.
Vivaldi, Bizet, Poulenc and Lutoslawski will feature in the opening May 5 concert of music for wind and piano by the Syrinx Trio who are Michael Cox and Richard Simpson, principal flute and principal oboe respectively with the BBC Symphony Orchestra, and keyboard player Janet Simpson, of the Hall.
The shepherds ask the priest leading the pilgrimage to Pan's cave who wrought this flute since clearly "da divine mani composta e incerata" (168) and the "savio sacerdote" explains that the reeds were once the beautiful nymph Syrinx whom Pan loved.
Since, to our knowledge, there is no reported case of syringomyelia after surgical intervention for spinal hydatid disease, here we describe the unique case of a patient with primary extradural hydatid cyst who developed a syrinx after surgery.
Gmhnk gmhnk fzzz fzzzz fzzz fzzz, a soft, almost electrical, noise comes from the syrinx of George.
Similar to our mammalian larynx, the syrinx enables birds to produce a far wider range of sounds than we could ever muster.
There was no evidence of spinal cord damage nor of cyst, syrinx or tumour formation.
Debussy wrote Syrinx in 1912 for solo flute, but playing it on a trumpet might make the highly subtle nuances in the piece somewhat evasive.
A baboon with balloon-cheeks blows the syrinx, a rat with tiny teeth hangs drooling over the lute (p.
This name comes from the Greek syrinx (a pipe), which refers to the hollow stems and is also the origin of the word syringe.
If scientific images are indeed important, Marvell also endlessly recycles the traditional mythological references when he writes about royalist heroes: Villiers is Hector carried away in the arms of Venus; Hastings is welcomed in the palace of the gods of antiquity; the Unfortunate Lover is implicitly compared to Prometheus; the Nymph suffers the fate of Niobe; "The Garden" is placed under the emblematic and meaningful evocation of the metamorphoses of Daphne and Syrinx.