tacit

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tacit

created or having effect by operation of law, rather than by being directly expressed
References in periodicals archive ?
But most authors analyze knowledge according to its tacitness (Choi, Cheng, Hilton, & Russell, 2005; Johnson, 2007), some focusing on differentiating the two poles: explicit and tacit knowledge (Becerra et al.
401) The tacitness of social innovations further underscores the importance of human conduits by which they spread.
Finally, organization culture possesses an inherent tacitness, complexity, and firm specificity that makes it very difficult to imitate by competitor organizations and so offers high potential for creating sustainable advantage (Barney, 1985).
Codification and tacitness as knowledge management strategies: an empirical exploration, Journal of High Technology Management Research, 12(1): 139-165.
On the other hand, tacitness or personalization strategy involves the keeping of knowledge in a state of fluid gestation that could only be shared through dialogue between individuals.
Two, these resources have time compression diseconomies of scale and high degree of tacitness and hence can't be easily copied by competitors(Reed and DeFillippi, 1990).
Due to the tacitness of part or even most of this knowledge, decisions concerning the retention of executives are challenging.
In a loosely coupled system, groups have internal coherence but lack rigid ties to other groups: "loose coupling also carries connotations of impermanence, dissolvability, and tacitness all of which are potentially crucial properties of the 'glue' that holds organizations together" (p.
There exists many definitions of tacit knowledge which differ with regard to the degrees of tacitness and capacity to articulate, its embodied or cognitive nature, and its subjective (individual, I) or objective (collective, tradition based) dimensions.
It is the tacitness of this knowledge that actually leads to MNE advantages over competitors (Harzing, 2000; Kogut & Zander, 1993), by enabling differentiation from competitors through its inimitability (e.