takeoff run

takeoff run

i. The distance traveled by an airplane from the commencement of takeoff to the point when it leaves the ground or water.
ii. The field length measured from the brake release to the end of the ground run plus one-third of the airborne distance to the screen height (i.e., 35 ft).
References in periodicals archive ?
The pilot later stated the airplane encountered small swells during the takeoff run and began to lose speed while simultaneously pitching forward.
This means the Takeoff Run Available and Takeoff Distance Available (TORA and TODA) in either direction is 5600 feet.
From my perch up front in the bombardier's station, I peer forward through the plexiglass nose as the heavy bomber begins its takeoff run.
The B-767 struck multiple flocks of birds during its takeoff run and lift off.
The Il-76 plane, which carried a humanitarian cargo, fell 500 meters from the takeoff run," he said.
There also have been a number of human errors committed by cockpit crew, such as starting a takeoff run without permission.
The 1910 all-British flying meeting offered prizes for various achievements, such as the aggregate time in the air during the week and the shortest takeoff run.
37% of bird strikes occurred during takeoff run and climb; 39% during approach.
The takeoff run was uneventful, but during the climb at about 200 feet altitude the crew felt a violent jolt in the controls.
Several days earlier a Swissair jet twice began its takeoff run at Heathrow before being told to stop.
For instance, when compared with C-130E models, the C-130J provides 40 percent greater range, 40 percent higher cruising ceiling, 50 percent decrease in time-to-climb, 21 percent increase in maximum speed, and 41 percent decrease in maximum effort takeoff run.