tapioca


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tapioca

(tăpēō`kə), widely used starchy food, obtained from the fleshy root of the bitter cassavacassava
or manioc
, name for many species of the genus Manihot of the family Euphorbiaceae (spurge family). The roots, which resemble sweet potatoes and are eaten in much the same way, yield cassava starch, a staple food in the tropics.
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. Tapioca is sold in flake or flour form and as the pellet pearl tapioca. Tapioca flour is widely used in place of wheat flour in regions where it is grown, e.g., South and Central America, Africa, the West Indies, and parts of India. When cooked it becomes transparent and increases in size. It is used to thicken puddings and soups.

Tapioca

 

starch granules obtained from the tuberous root of cassava, a tropical plant. The starch of the cassava root is refined, pressed through a sieve, and heated on metal plates at a temperature of 150°C; this causes it to become somewhat glutinous and to agglomerate into granules. Tapioca is easily digested and is used in soups, cereals, and other food preparations. It is produced mainly in tropical countries of Asia, Africa, and South America. World production of cassava in 1972 was 105.4 million tons. Certain varieties of sago, such as the Brazilian sago, are sometimes called tapioca.

tapioca

[‚tap·ē′ō·kə]
(food engineering)
A food, high in starch, that is made from the cassava plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Joseph who imports tapioca and banana snacks from India said that their new venture will be a great support for farmers and a support to the economy of India too.
The results revealed that the calorimeter gelatinization temperatures and the enthalpy values of the tapioca starch mixtures increased and decreased significantly, respectively, with increasing xanthan gum content.
The name "bubble tea" itself likely comes from the bubbles made in the cup when shaken, and not from the tapioca balls themselves.
To examine the socio-economic characteristics and the problems faced by the Tapioca growers.
Consistent dozing of Tapioca fiber residue in to HUASBR.
In a medium mixing bowl fitted with standard beaters (not a dough hook), combine yeast, rice flour, tapioca starch, dry milk powder, xanthan gum, gelatin powder, 1/4 teaspoon sea salt and herbes de Provence.
The tapioca starch factory currently emits methane into the air without any restrictions.
Bubble tea is also known as boba drink, pearl tea drink, boba ice tea, boba, boba nai cha, zhen zhou nai cha, pearl milk tea, pearl ice tea, black pearl tea, tapioca ball drink, BBT, PT, pearl shake and QQ (which means chewy in Chinese), according to www.
Paper mills use starches from various sources, such as regular corn, waxy maize, tapioca, potato, and wheat.
Conveniently for the elephants, this is also the time when hundreds of trucks rumble along the nine-mile road, laden with newly-harvested tapioca and sugar cane - particular pachyderm favourites.
Among the operational areas will be Lampung as a center for cassava and tapioca processing business, South Sulawesi as a production center for charcoal, corn, cacao and coffee.
TAPIOCA, the slimy pudding dish known as 'frogspawn' by generations of children, is our most hated school dinner, a survey out today reveals.