Tarsus


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Related to Tarsus: Taurus, tarsal bone, Saul of Tarsus, Paul of tarsus

Tarsus

(tär`səs, Turk. tärso͝os`), city (1990 pop. 191,333), S Turkey, in Cilicia, on the Tarsus (anc. Cydnus) River, near the Mediterranean Sea. It is an agricultural trade center; copper, zinc, chromium, and coal are mined in the region. Ancient Tarsus, first mentioned in the 8th cent. B.C., was the capital of Cilicia and one of the most important cities of Asia Minor. It reached the height of its prosperity and cultural achievement under Roman rule. The city was destroyed by the Arabs c.A.D. 660 and was rebuilt by them in the 780s. It was captured by the Ottoman Turks in 1515. The apostle Paul was born there.

Tarsus

 

in arthropods, the penultimate (distal) segment of the limb, usually in movable articulation with the tibia, rarely merging with it into a single segment (tibiotarsus). In most insects, the tarsus consists of one to five subsegments, of which the last one usually bears two ungues (more rarely, one) on its tip. In the Scutigera the tarsus consists of numerous small articles. Sometimes there are special appendages under the ungues that serve as suckers when crawling on smooth objects.


Tarsus

 

a city in southern Turkey, in feel Province; situated along a railroad and a highway connecting Adana with Mersin. Population, 75,000 (1970). Tarsus is the commercial center of a major cotton-growing region. Industries include cotton ginning, textile manufacturing, cement production, and food processing.


Tarsus

 

an ancient city in what is now Turkey, near the modern town of the same name; the site was inhabited from the sixth millennium B.C. to the third or fourth century A.D. Excavations at Gözlükule, conducted between 1934 and 1938, established that a settlement existed at the site of Tarsus during the Neolithic period, in the sixth to fifth millennia B.C. In the fourth millennium, Tarsus came under the increasing influence of the El-Obeid culture; in the third millennium it was a fortified town with a developed metallurgical industry; in the second millennium it apparently became a part of the Hittite state, as evidenced by Hittite seals found there. Iron implements, such as axes, adzes, and weapons, first appeared in Tarsus between 1100 B.C. and 850 B.C. and were widely distributed from 850 B.C. to 700 B.C. In the seventh century B.C., Tarsus was part of Assyria. Tombs from the Hellenistic and Roman eras have been excavated from the city’s upper layers.

REFERENCE

Excavations at Gözlü Kule: Tarsus, vols. 1–3. Princeton, N.J., 1950–63. (Contains bibliography.)

tarsus

[′tär·səs]
(anatomy)
The instep of the foot consisting of the calcaneus, talus, cuboid, navicular, medial, intermediate, and lateral cuneiform bones.
The dense connective tissues supporting an eyelid.

tarsus

1. the bones of the ankle and heel, collectively
2. the corresponding part in other mammals and in amphibians and reptiles
3. the dense connective tissue supporting the free edge of each eyelid
4. the part of an insect's leg that lies distal to the tibia

Tarsus

1. a city in SE Turkey, on the Tarsus River: site of ruins of ancient Tarsus, capital of Cilicia, and birthplace of St. Paul. Pop.: 231 000 (2005 est.)
2. a river in SE Turkey, in Cilicia, rising in the Taurus Mountains and flowing south past Tarsus to the Mediterranean. Length: 153 km (95 miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
capital of Tarsus (excluding the interests of his adult children) is 8,867,046
We are left with the conclusion that, while at Tarsus we have reasonable archaeological evidence for a destruction, we have no good textual evidence for such a destruction under Sennacherib.
Male and female genital fields similar to those of subgenus Unionicola; pedipalps somewhat elongate and typical of Unionicola; first walking legs less setose than those of subgenus Unionicola; first walking leg with few, thickened, rather blunt setae on genu and tibia, with tarsus rather undifferentiated.
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Setae of eupathidium-type, not sharpened terminally and covered with setules, slightly bent towards proximal part of the segment, especially numerous on tarsus I, present among other setulose setae arising at ventral side of tarsi.
I'm confident the church in Tarsus could soon change from being a museum to a center of spiritual pilgrimage," said Bishop Luigi Padovese, speaking after the close of worldwide commemorations to mark the 2,000th anniversary of the birth of St.
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Dr Sentamu said: "This Sunday we celebrate the conversation of Saul of Tarsus, a person totally opposed to the Christian faith and who was actively persecuting Christians.
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By what name is the Biblical figure Saul of Tarsus better known?
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