teazle


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teasel

, teazel, teazle
1. any of various stout biennial plants of the genus Dipsacus, of Eurasia and N Africa, having prickly leaves and prickly heads of yellow or purple flowers: family Dipsacaceae
2. 
a. the prickly dried flower head of the fuller's teasel, used for teasing
b. any manufactured implement used for the same purpose

teasel

The most famous plant used for Lyme disease- Dipsacus sylvestris being the most effective. The root is the part used. Plant grows up to 8 ft (2.5m) and is easily recognized by their prickly egg-shaped balls on top of long prickly stems with wrinkly opposite leaves that have prickles on the underside along the middle. Upper leaves grow together forming water-catching cup around stem.The oval prickly heads have sharp, pointy fingers sticking out from underneath, and one or two bands of pinkish purple flowers growing around in rings. used for muscle/joint pain and inflammation, arthritis, diuretic, detox, diarrhea, improves appetite, liver, gallbladder, jaundice, warts, stomach, cancer. Leaf tea used for acne.
References in periodicals archive ?
On this, ma'am, Lady Teazle, seeing Sir Peter in such danger, ran out of the room in strong hysterics, and Charles after her, calling out for hartshorn and water; then, madam, they began to fight with swords--
Then we meet the newly hitched Sir Peter (Bedford), whose fallings out with the much younger Lady Teazle (Kate Fry) - a budding scandalista - threaten both his own comfort and the potential happiness of his ward, Maria (Devon Sorvari).
Between 2,500 and 4,000 teazle heads were hand-picked and mounted on rods on a rotating drum known as a gig.
Sir Peter Teazle (Kenneth Cranham) in a disappointing performance as harsh as it was unfriendly, seemed frequently to be on the point of losing his lines.
It also means that the late Montjeu joins an elite list of stallions - namely Sir Peter Teazle (born 1784), Waxy (1790), Cyllene (1895) and Blandford (1919) - t o have sired four Derby winners.
First performed in Drury Lane in 1777, the play concerns the marriage of the wealthy Sir Peter Teazle to a young daughter of a country squire and Lady Sneerwell's attempts to undermine the validity of the marriage by trying to persuade Teazle that his newly-wed is having an affair.
Should he do so, he will become his sire's fourth winner of the race and thus see him equal the record held jointly by Sir Peter Teazle (1784-1811), Waxy (1790-1817), Cyllene (1895-1925), and Blandford (1919-1935).
Horse Heroes" will showcase the family's paintings of legendary horses, including Derby heroes Sir Pete Teazle, Hyperion and Sansovino, as well as work by Sir Alfred Munnings and John Wootton.
Lord Derby took up with the actress Eliza Farren, famed for her performances as Lady Teazle in Richard Brinsley Sheridan's new play, The School for Scandal.
Herod, his son Highflyer, and Highflyer's son Sir Peter Teazle won 31 sires' titles between them in 33 years, and branches of the Herod line still seemed potent until relatively recent times, particularly when Djebel flourished in France after World War II.
1787 The first Derby won by the man after whom the race was named as Sir Peter Teazle gets the better of Gunpowder.