technostructure


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technostructure

the technical and bureaucratic class which GALBRAITH (1967) regards as replacing the previously dominant capitalist class (of private owners and entrepreneurs) within modern industrial societies. See also SEPARATION OF OWNERSHIP AND CONTROL, MANAGERIAL REVOLUTION, SERVICE CLASS.
References in periodicals archive ?
And, just as important, the heroic work of Michael Milken smashed the technostructure, facilitating the productivity revolution of the early 1990s.
This means that the technostructure may readily trade profits for protection against such an undirected event with such an unpredictable outcome as a strike" (Galbraith, 1967, 265).
The machine bureaucracy had a large support staff, technostructure, and operating core.
Mintzberg (1979: 306) characterized the small business as follows: 'Typically, it had little or no technostructure, few support staffers, a loose division of labor, minimal differentiation among its units, and a small managerial hierarchy.
Globalisation, gestion financiere internationale, la structure du pouvoir mondial, gestion et la structure des entreprises multinationales, structure des fonctions essentielles, structure des grandes divisions, technostructure.
The power of the corporate bureaucracy--the power of technostructure (a term that did not take off)--is something to which I still adhere.
In this model, technostructure and support staff become part of the various SBUs.
Cohn-Bendit, knowing well how the European Parliament works and enthusiastic that the Parliament can be the vehicle for better control by the people on the technostructure if the European administration ran a campaign closely centered on European issues with a strong social and ecological dimension.
In his discussion of organizational effectiveness and organizational structure, Mintzberg (1979) stated that there are five basic parts to any organization: (a) strategic apex, (b) middle-line, (c) operating core, (d) support staff, and (e) technostructure.
While the rural agricultural population and the urban informal service sector constitute substantial labor pools that can be tapped for blue-collar and low-skill service needs, there is a smaller pool of educated labor to meet demands among the managerial ranks and professional technostructure required by modern industrial and service economies.
Galbraith argued in The New Industrial State that the technostructure, the staff management team, was motivated by a desire to avoid excessive risk.
The most important difference between these distinguished scholars was that Ayres continued to use the Veblenian dichotomy to distinguish between technology and institutions, but Galbraith merged technological and institutional decisions into the technostructure.