temper


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temper

the degree of hardness, elasticity, or a similar property of a metal or metal object

temper

[′tem·pər]
(engineering)
To moisten and mix clay, plaster, or mortar to the proper consistency for use.
(metallurgy)
The hardness and strength of a rolled metal.
The nominal carbon content of steel.
To soften hardened steel or cast iron by reheating to some temperature below the eutectoid temperature.
An alloy added to pure tin to make the finest pewter.

temper

1. To mix lime, sand, and water in such proportions as to make mortar for masonry or plastering.
2. To moisten and mix clay to proper consistency to form bricks, etc., prior to hardening by fire.
3. To bring to a proper degree of hardness and elasticity for use, as steel or other metal, by heat treatment.
4. To impregnate wood fibers or composition board with a drying oil or other oxidizing resin and subsequently to cure with heat so as to improve the strength, hardness, water resistance, and durability of the board.
References in classic literature ?
Her shoulders shook and she seemed about to fly into a fit of temper.
He had never been an unhappy man; his own temper had secured him from that, even in his first marriage; but his second must shew him how delightful a welljudging and truly amiable woman could be, and must give him the pleasantest proof of its being a great deal better to choose than to be chosen, to excite gratitude than to feel it.
She is an excellent, warm-hearted woman, with a quick temper and very little judgment; strongly attached to Norah, and heartily interested in Norah's welfare.
I dare say you're wondering why I don't put my arm round your waist,' the Duchess said after a pause: `the reason is, that I'm doubtful about the temper of your flamingo.
Bingley intended it likewise, and sometimes made choice of his county; but as he was now provided with a good house and the liberty of a manor, it was doubtful to many of those who best knew the easiness of his temper, whether he might not spend the remainder of his days at Netherfield, and leave the next generation to purchase.
She hoped to marry him, and they continued together till she was obliged to be convinced that such hope was vain, and till the disappointment and wretchedness arising from the conviction rendered her temper so bad, and her feelings for him so like hatred, as to make them for a while each other's punishment, and then induce a voluntary separation.
Lady Susan is surely too severe, for Frederica does not seem to have the sort of temper to make severity necessary.
To speak now of the true temper of empire, it is a thing rare and hard to keep; for both temper, and distemper, consist of contraries.
Tib had to be considered, and she has a very queer temper.
If that, however, should fail to be a reparation, it will at least show us that the king was wrong to lose his temper.
Long brooding on his failure, continual arrangement and rearrangement of his deserts and rebuffs, had made Sir Francis much of an egoist, and in his retirement his temper became increasingly difficult and exacting.
1886, and abode in it until 1892, made it at once the scene of such constant offence that he had no time, if he had the temper, for defence.