tender

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Related to tenderness: rebound tenderness

tender

1
(of a sailing vessel) easily keeled over by a wind; crank

tender

2
Commerce a formal offer to supply specified goods or services at a stated cost or rate

tender

3
1. a small boat, such as a dinghy, towed or carried by a yacht or ship
2. a vehicle drawn behind a steam locomotive to carry the fuel and water

Tender

 

an auxiliary vessel designated for the basing of warship units at stationary points and also for supporting them at sea. There are tenders for submarines and surface ships.

Tenders have repair equipment, workshops, tanks for liquid fuel and fresh water, and quarters for the personnel of ships being serviced by the tender. For example, an American tender for atomic missile submarines can serve as the base for nine to ten submarines. It has a displacement of 23,000 tons and a traveling speed of 37 km/hr (20 knots) and is armed with two to four multipurpose guns with calibers of 76–127 mm.

The first tenders appeared during World War I. During World War II, the United States employed 11 submarine tenders, and the British Navy used three for submarines and two for destroyers. After the war, tenders became the principal means of support for the basing and operations of units of various types of submarines.

In the fishing industry, tenders are called fish factory ships and fish mother ships.

tender

[′ten·dər]
(mechanical engineering)
A vehicle that is attached to a locomotive and carries supplies of fuel and water.
(naval architecture)
A naval auxiliary ship that serves as a mobile base for repair and limited resupply of other ships.

tender

A proposal or bid for a contract to perform work, often on a form, completed by a contractor, giving estimated price and time to complete a contract.
References in classic literature ?
All men seemed so pitiful, so poor, in comparison with this feeling of tenderness and love he experienced: in comparison with that softened, grateful, last look she had given him through her tears.
Marriage, which was to bring guidance into worthy and imperative occupation, had not yet freed her from the gentlewoman's oppressive liberty: it had not even filled her leisure with the ruminant joy of unchecked tenderness.
The deep spiritual insight, the celestial music, and the brooding tenderness of Whittier have always taken me more than his fierier appeals and his civic virtues, though I do not underrate the value of these in his verse.
The fresh boyish face was gone, the tenderness of the eyes, the sweetness of the mouth with its curves and pictured corners.
she asked, with a tenderness the power of which to thrill him she knew full well.
With this deep consciousness of what they owed towards the being to which they had given life, added to the active spirit of tenderness that animated both, it may be imagined that while during every hour of my infant life I received a lesson of patience, of charity, and of self-control, I was so guided by a silken cord that all seemed but one train of enjoyment to me.
Nature has such imperishable charms, such inextinguishable tenderness for me
He paused, looked at me, and repeated the famous lines of Dante on the Evening-time, with a melody and tenderness which added a charm of their own to the matchless beauty of the poetry itself.
The unspeakable suggestions of tenderness that lie in the dimpled elbow, and all the varied gently lessening curves, down to the delicate wrist, with its tiniest, almost imperceptible nicks in the firm softness.
Contract awarded for gram positive, reagents and tenderness.
PMS-related breast discomfort like tenderness, aches, swelling and heaviness can be really disruptive to a woman's regular routine -- often dictating what she will wear, whether or not she'll go to the gym or even partake in sexual activity," said Anja Krammer, President, BioPharmX Corporation.
Pope Francis' Revolution of Tenderness and Love: Theological and Pastoral Perspectives" by Cardinal Walter Kasper (President of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity) is a 120 page commentary outlying the significant influences that have led the Cardinal to call Francis a pope leading a radical revolution of tenderness and love because what the globally popular Pope preaches and the church reforms he is championing are solidly rooted in the gospel.