tepee

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tepee

or

tipi

(both: tē`pē), typical dwelling of Native North Americans living on the Great Plains. It was usually made by arranging tent poles into a conical frame and spreading skins, usually buffalo hide, tightly over it. An aperture was generally left at the top for smoke. The tepee was sometimes very elaborately decorated. It was highly mobile, being dragged by a horse when the tribe was on the move, and provided a strong shelter against the weather; it was thus an ideal dwelling for the nomadic Plains area tribes such as the Sioux and the Blackfoot. Because of the adaptability of the tepee to prairie life, Gen. Henry Sibley used it as a model for the tent that bears his name.

Bibliography

See R. Laubin and G. Laubin, The Indian Tipi (1957, repr. 1971).

Tepee

A tent of the American Indians, made usually from animal skins laid on a conical frame of long poles and having an opening at the top for ventilation and a flap door.

Tepee

 

a dwelling used by hunting Indian tribes on the prairies of North America.

A tepee is a conical tent constructed of poles with a closely fitting cover of sewn buffalo or deer hides. The upper part has two flaps of hide that protect the smoke hole from the wind; at the bottom is an entrance opening, covered with a flap of hide. Tepees hold six to 15 people and are well adapted to the nomadic way of life.

tipi

A relatively lightweight, transportable, conically shaped dwelling primarily of American Indians of the Great Plains; its base was generally egglike in plan, with the narrower end of the base at the entrance. The framework consisted of heavy wood poles, fixed in the ground at their lower ends and lashed together at the top. This framework was covered with decorated waterproof animal skins, sewn together with sinew and secured to the ground by pegs driven through loops at the base of the cover. Another type of tipi, used by tribes in the eastern regions of America, had a domed rather than a conical framework consisting of branches bent over, tied together, and covered by bark or animal skins sewn together with sinew to provide a waterproof covering. Also spelled tepee or teepee.

tepee

, teepee
a cone-shaped tent of animal skins used by certain North American Indians
References in periodicals archive ?
New York City tepees tend to open up to the ceiling - but that's not stopping interior designers and boutique owners from setting them up.
Campers can also cover both sides of the pioneer experience by staying in a covered wagon and in a tepee similar to those used by some Native American tribes.
In fact, visitors have the choice of staying in the guest house that sleeps six and has a breathtaking view of the Rockies in every direction, or bunking in the tepees situated near the main house, down by the glacier-fed Blaeberry River, which flows alongside the ranch.
The tepees are eye-catching and we hope that many youngsters will take advantage of the excellent range of activities planned during the week.
Gardeners who prefer pole beans like the way they make great use of vertical space by climbing up trellises or tepees, a bonus in small gardens.
Listen to elders speak about respect for the land and its resources, visit a tepee encampment in early winter and learn about the excitement and hard work of a bison kill (306/787-2815 or www.
For the Navajo, a traditional home wasn't a tepee, but a hogan--a six- or eight-sided structure made of horizontal logs and covered with mud.
Funded in part by the Youth in Wilderness Project (a joint effort of the Sierra Club and The Sierra Club Foundation), Seven Tepees introduces youth to outdoor activities that most Sierra Club families take for granted--and consider essential to their understanding of the world.
The climbdown came on the second day of a High Court hearing in London in which 48-year-old Brig Oubridge challenged an order banning him from siting tepees on the land where he has lived and brought up his family.
The Welsh Office's climb-down came on the second day of a High Court hearing in London in which Brig Oubridge, aged 48, challenged an order banning him from placing tepees on the land where he has lived and brought up his family for 20 years at Penlan Fach, Llanfynydd.
But playing Indian at camp (building fires, sleeping in tepees, learning to canoe, and participating in Indian ceremonies) also served to instill and perpetuate patriotism among the youth.
Soon after this, we watched a show about Native Americans in the Midwest, and she saw how they dismantled their tepees to move and follow the buffalo herds.