terminal


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terminal

1. (of a disease) terminating in death
2. of or relating to the storage or delivery of freight at a warehouse
3. 
a. a point at which current enters or leaves an electrical device, such as a battery or a circuit
b. a conductor by which current enters or leaves at such a point
4. Computing a device having input/output links with a computer but situated at a distance from the computer
5. Architect
a. an ornamental carving at the end of a structure
b. another name for term (sense 5)
6. 
a. a point or station usually at the end of the line of a railway, serving as an important access point for passengers or freight
b. a less common name for terminus
7. Physiol
a. the smallest arteriole before its division into capillaries
b. either of two veins that collect blood from the thalamus and surrounding structures and empty it into the internal cerebral vein
c. the portion of a bronchiole just before it subdivides into the air sacs of the lungs

Terminal

A terminus occurring at the end of a series of incidents, as a resting point; a point of emphasis, as in an object situated at the end of an element.

Terminal

 

a device in a computer system designed for input of data and output of information—for example, in man-machine interaction.

Most computer users are some distance from time-sharing computer centers; therefore, they gain access to the computer through terminals linked to the computer by data transmission channels. Examples of terminals include teletypewriters, telephone apparatus equipped with a keyboard for transmitting addresses and commands, cathode-ray tube data displays, and automatic text readers. Terminals are used in systems for automatic control and design, information retrieval, and programmed learning. A distinction is made between terminals designed only for direct data input and output, which sometimes include a memory unit for temporary storage of data, and terminals that incorporate a small computer and are used for preliminary data processing, the solution of problems that are common for specific users, and control of data transmission processes.

Terminals are coming into use in hospitals, libraries, commercial establishments, hotels, and advance ticket sales offices.

REFERENCES

Wilkes, M. Sistemy s razdeleniem vremeni. Moscow, 1972. (Translated from English.)
Chachko, A. G. Chelovekzapul’torn. Moscow, 1974.

A. G. CHACHKO

terminal

[′ter·mən·əl]
(architecture)
The ornamental finish, decorative element, or termination of an object, item of construction, or structural part.
(computer science)
A site or location at which data can leave or enter a system.
(electricity)
A screw, soldering lug, or other point to which electric connections can be made. Also known as electric terminal.
The equipment at the end of a microwave relay system or other communication channel.
One of the electric input or output points of a circuit or component.
(mathematics)
The vertex with outdegree 0 that is specified in the definition of an s-t network.

terminal

1. An electrically conductive element, attached to the end of a conductor or piece of equipment for connection to an external conductor.
2. The ornamental finish, decorative element, or termination of an object, item of construction, or structural part.

terminal

(hardware)
An electronic or electromechanical device for entering data into a computer or a communications system and displaying data received. Early terminals were called teletypes, later ones VDUs. Typically a terminal communicates with the computer via a serial line.

terminal

(electronics)
The end of a line where signals are either transmitted or received, or a point along the length of a line where the signals are made available to apparatus.

terminal

(electronics)
Apparatus to send and/or receive signals on a line.

terminal

(1) An input/output (I/O) device for a computer that has a keyboard and mouse for input and a video screen for output. Older terminals did not have a mouse and used a printer for output. See dumb terminal and ATM machine.

(2) Any entrance or exit node for input or output; for example, a scanner or camera for input or a monitor or printer for output.

(3) A connector used to attach a wire. The wire is fastened by pressure, by a clip of some type or by tightening a screw. See bindings.

(4) (Terminal) A command line interface on a Unix-based computer. The following example from a Mac OS X computer shows two commands; one that switches the current folder (directory) to the desktop and another that lists the files that begin with "X."

Function                      Unix Command

  Change directory to desktop   cd desktop
  List files beginning with X   ls X*

The Terminal Window
The two commands required to list files that begin with "X" on the desktop are shown in this Mac example.
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The DIT 6040A thin client terminal - available with the Devon Terminal Operating System (DeTOS) - delivers reliability, security, and performance features.
Designed as the only 24-hour terminal at JFK, Terminal 4 can process up to 3,200 arriving passengers per hour, compared with a design capacity of 2,000 in the old facility.
Building a larger terminal at Burbank Airport is not necessary.
LAX Two Corporation was not provided notice that LAWA was even considering this action regarding Terminal 2.
This new state-of-the-art ferry terminal will serve as the gateway for tourists and New Yorkers alike traveling to the revitalized St.