territorial imperative


Also found in: Medical.

territorial imperative

the tendency of individuals or groups of individuals to protect their own territories (Ardrey, 1967). While the ‘territorial behaviour’ of some birds and animals is well established (see ETHOLOGY), the notion that some human behaviour is closely analogous, i.e. instinctive, is treated with much scepticism in sociology, along with other such suggestions made by SOCIOBIOLOGY.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
When marking and defending boundaries were crucial for canine survival, they likely had a key role, adding a dog's unique and identifying scent to his excrement; today, salutatory butt-sniffing might very well be an evolutionary remnant of that territorial imperative.
Kingdoms warred with others to whet the territorial imperative, and monarchs were guillotined by the nobles to end their divine rights.
the territorial imperative, whereby the individual struggles to claim and/ or defend his or her particular space (usually interior) and thus assert and/ or protect his or her identity;
Cooper puts it that Europe should consist more or less entirely of states which are no longer governed by the territorial imperative.
In the end, he argues that US policy in the Middle East is guided by a territorial imperative to contain an emerging China.
These individuals are set in direct contrast to the "absurdly over-determined characterisation" (Jacobs 1987:33) of, for example, the Kloppers, who represent "the territorial imperative gone berserk" (Newman 1990:62).
It was the beginning of nesting season, when the territorial imperative was at its height.
Residents of this great, roiling, territorial imperative whose splashy crime stories, high-profile romances and oddball trends make news everywhere there is white space to fill.
TERRITORIAL IMPERATIVE (Mainichi Daily News as translated from the Japanese-language Mainichi Shimbun)
He indicates Faulkner's tangled obsessions: the focalizing consciounesses (Quentin Compson, Horace Benbow, Gavin Stevens), the palimpsests of titles ('The Dark House', 'As I Lay Dying'), the endlessly sliding fractal constellations of related novels (Sartoris/Sanctuary/Requiem and others), Faulkner's merging and rebounding voices; the ways his pastoral shifts into politics, myth into class relations, history into interpretation; the conflicts and surprising collusions between the technical and territorial imperative in his creative ambitions.
At a time when religion is easily becoming privatized and reduced to one's spiritual experience in carefully circumscribed times and places, the territorial imperative to be concerned with and to make a contribution to the good of the larger community seems terribly important.

Full browser ?