testator

(redirected from testatrix)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

testator

(feminine), testatrix
a person who makes a will, esp one who dies testate
References in periodicals archive ?
We do not mean to relax the rule that one may dispose of his estate to whom he pleased barring legal limitations, but we do hold that when a total stranger moves into the home with an old lady, secures her confidence, and shows up after her death with a will to what she has that none of her lawful heirs know anything about, and which is surrounded by other suspicious circumstances, the burden is on him to show that he came by it as the free voluntary act of the testatrix and that she was in her right mind when she executed it.
he was allowed by his father, and later by the testatrix, to live on the farm and treat it as his own.
505, 506-07 (1881) ("While the testatrix had no right to alter the laws of descent, yet she had the right to dispose of her property as she wished, and might .
property of the testatrix, but rather of the testatrix's widower.
A number of these smaller items were designated for female friends and relatives; they were most likely chosen by the testatrix herself, and likewise left to those she chose; they were not conveyed as part of a family patrimony.
Tutt had been revoked by the testatrix or at her direction.
If at the time of its execution the testatrix was capable of recollecting her property, the natural objects of her bounty and their claims upon her, knew the business about which she was engaged and how she wished to dispose of her property, that is sufficient.
Thus, despite education on the ills of fractionation, the decision is, in the end, left to the testator or testatrix.
A contrary holding would deny to a party at interest in the estate, other than as heir, an opportunity to attack the probate, and thereby as against such party make the probate conclusive, thus defeating his interest in the estate of the testatrix.
The beneficiary was entitled to the trust principal if he demanded it "to engage in some business or enterprise"; considering the broad and personal nature of the purpose, the court found the trust to be a "pretext" for the purpose of allowing the testatrix to give property to her husband while keeping it from his creditors.
Mr Hoskins was seeking to propound the earlier will made pursuant to the mutual wills agreement, and claimed in the alternative that the executors of the later will should be directed to hold the property of the testatrix in trust according to the agreement.