sick

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Related to the sick man: Stick man

sick

1. inclined or likely to vomit
2. 
a. suffering from ill health
b. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the sick
3. 
a. of, relating to, or used by people who are unwell
b. (in combination): sickbed
4. deeply affected with a mental or spiritual feeling akin to physical sickness
5. mentally, psychologically, or spiritually disturbed
6. an informal word for vomit
References in classic literature ?
After a few minutes' bustle beside the high bedstead, those who had carried the sick man dispersed.
While she was telling me her story they seem to have carried the sick man to the top of the staircase and then left him there.
The voice of the sick man became tense with ear- nestness.
I had had time to note these little particulars, and to mark the heavy breathing and feverish startings of the sick man, before he was aware of my presence.
The sick man was able to call his friends with a stronger voice.
It was curious to see how eagerly the sick man, debarred from any change of position save the mere turning of his head from side to side, watched every motion of his friend in the progress of the game; and with what eagerness and interest he played, and yet how warily and coolly.
He would have killed the sick man before he left had it not occurred to him that it would really have been a kindness to do so.
It was a stagnation in which, full of pity for him, Anne of Austria would not have willingly left him; but in order to attract the attention of the sick man by some brilliant stroke, she must have either won or lost.
Come in here," said d'Avrigny, and he took him into the chamber where the sick man lay.
One afternoon in perfect desperation he burst into that room and made such a scene, tearing his hair and shouting such horrid imprecations that he cowed the contemptuous spirit of the sick man.
And yet the sick man was whole for the time being; the virile spirit was once more master of the recreant members; and it was with illogical relief that I found those I sought standing almost unconcernedly beside the binnacle.
The doctor came in, a precise little old man, a German, looking about him mistrustfully; he went up to the sick man, took his pulse, carefully felt his head and with the help of Katerina Ivanovna he unbuttoned the blood-stained shirt, and bared the injured man's chest.