thermal

(redirected from thermal sensation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to thermal sensation: thermal environment, Thermal comfort

thermal

1. of, relating to, caused by, or generating heat or increased temperature
2. (of garments or fabrics) specially designed so as to have exceptional heat-retaining properties
3. Meteorol a column of rising air caused by local unequal heating of the land surface, and used by gliders and birds to gain height

thermal

[′thər·məl]
(meteorology)
A relatively small-scale, rising current of air produced when the atmosphere is heated enough locally by the earth's surface to produce absolute instability in its lower layers.
(thermodynamics)
Of or concerning heat.

thermal

A column of rising air heated by the sun or other phenomena. Sailplane and glider pilots use it for soaring. The pilots recognize the presence of a thermal with the help of a variometer—an instrument having two tubes with red and green indicators. A red means a downward air current, and a green means an upward air current, or a thermal. See variometer.
References in periodicals archive ?
The asymmetric cooling methodology results in reduced time to thermal comfort and enables a balanced overall thermal sensation.
Results of the occupant evaluation of thermal sensation in the PMV scale is presented in Fig.
Although previous studies have widely researched thermal comfort and IAQ for building indoor environments, there is little quantitative information available on the relationship between acceptable thermal sensation and IAQ, especially for occupants of a health care facility.
It has been reported that with increased physical activity the temperature in the facemask microclimate increases,7,19causing increase in thermal sensations of the whole body20, which decreases work endurance.
To overcome this problem, the thermal sensation index should be calculated as an implicit result of the six previously mentioned variables influencing human's thermal sensation.
2] Edward Arens, Hui, Zhang, Charlie Huizenga (2006),"Partial and whole body Thermal sensation and Comfort", Journal of Thermal Biology, Vol.
There are a good correlation between mean skin temperature and the thermal sensation and thermal comfort of a human body.
In addition, some patients reported a misinterpretation of sensation (cold for warm or vice versa) or an undefined rather than thermal sensation.
Development of a temperature control procedure for a room air-conditioner using the concept of just noticeable difference (JND) in thermal sensation.