thiamine pyrophosphate


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

thiamine pyrophosphate:

see coenzymecoenzyme
, any one of a group of relatively small organic molecules required for the catalytic function of certain enzymes. A coenzyme may either be attached by covalent bonds to a particular enzyme or exist freely in solution, but in either case it participates intimately in
..... Click the link for more information.
; vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Thiamine Pyrophosphate

 

(also cocarboxylase), a coenzyme that participates in the enzymic transformations of α-keto acids and keto sugars; it is present in all animal and plant tissues, as well as in microorganisms.

The catalytic activity of thiamine pyrophosphate is associated with ionization of the carbon atom in the second position of the thiazole ring, to which a molecule of a substrate attaches itself. In industry, thiamine pyrophosphate is obtained from thiamine and pyrophosphoric acid. (For the medical use of thiamine pyrophosphate, SeeCOCARBOXYLASE.)

REFERENCE

Kokarboksilaza i drugie tiaminfosfaty. Minsk, 1974.

thiamine pyrophosphate

[′thī·ə·mən ¦pī·rō′fä‚sfāt]
(biochemistry)
The coenzyme or prosthetic component of carboxylase; catalyzes decarboxylation of various α-keto acids. Also known as cocarboxylase.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, thiamine is part of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), which is necessary for the conversion for carbohydrate metabolism.
The use of erythrocyte transketolase activity is an easy way of observing deficiency of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), and it has been found to be a frequently abnormal laboratory test that is guarantee of the biochemical lesion.
Thiamine pyrophosphate is involved in the oxidation pathway and may be responsible for the energy required for nerve conduction.