thing


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

thing

1
Law any object or right that may be the subject of property (as distinguished from a person)

thing

2
a law court or public assembly in the Scandinavian countries

Thing

 

separate object of material reality, possessing relative independence and stability of existence.

A thing is a definite entity because of its structural, functional, qualitative, and quantitative characteristics. The properties of a thing are the most general expression of its particular characteristics, and the place and role of a given thing in a definite system are expressed through its relations with other things. The category of thing was especially widely used in philosophy until the 19th century; moreover, the principal attribute of things was considered to be their corporeality. Instead of the category of thing, contemporary philosophy usually uses the categories of object and physical entity. However, in the analysis of socioeconomic problems the term thing (and its derivatives such as “thingness”) has retained its independent meaning for designating the process of acquiring thinglike qualities (reification), when the relations between people take on a perverse form and look like the relations between things. This occurs, for example, under the conditions of the universal development of commodity relations in a capitalist society. The concept of thing is also used in logic.

REFERENCE

Uemov, A. I. Veshchi, svoistva, i otnosheniia. Moscow, 1963.

I. S. ALEKSEEV


Thing

 

a popular assembly in medieval Scandinavia. In the early medieval period, the thing was an important social and cultural meeting place of the bonders. Gradually the thing changed from an assembly of all the bonders into an assembly of their representatives, who were elected by the population or were appointed by the clergy or royal deputies. As royal power was strengthened, the all-things (common things uniting several localities) were brought under state control, but the local things retained a degree of autonomy. The term thing is retained in the names of several of the Scandinavian parliaments—the Danish Folketing, the Icelandic Althing, and the Norwegian Storting.

References in classic literature ?
Let Marmee think we are getting things for ourselves, and then surprise her.
Concerning the old carpenter who fixed the bed for the writer, I only mentioned him because he, like many of what are called very common people, became the nearest thing to what is understandable and lovable of all the grotesques in the writer's book.
I admit they do sometimes come too close to be pleasant, but we don't run away; we are used to it, and understand it, and if we never had blinkers put on we should never want them; we should see what was there, and know what was what, and be much less frightened than by only seeing bits of things that we can't understand.
He would lie on the grass "watching things growing," he said.
But the thing that had been sitting at the table was gone.
Yes, that's it,' said the Hatter with a sigh: `it's always tea-time, and we've no time to wash the things between whiles.
Thou dost not understand me, Sancho," said Don Quixote; "I only mean he must have made some compact with the devil to infuse this power into the ape, that he may get his living, and after he has grown rich he will give him his soul, which is what the enemy of mankind wants; this I am led to believe by observing that the ape only answers about things past or present, and the devil's knowledge extends no further; for the future he knows only by guesswork, and that not always; for it is reserved for God alone to know the times and the seasons, and for him there is neither past nor future; all is present.
I never yet heard of a useless thing that was not ground out of existence by evolution sooner or later.
Things that sound contradictory should be examined by the same rules as in dialectical refutation whether the same thing is meant, in the same relation, and in the same sense.
Of course I have myself made up all the things you say.
Not the slightest, but yet it seems to me a shocking thing that a mere joke should lead to such consequences.
One thing cannot be two cubits long in a greater degree than another.