stereopsis

(redirected from three-dimensional vision)
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Related to three-dimensional vision: stereoscopic vision, 3D Vision

stereopsis

[‚ster·ē′äp·səs]
(physiology)

stereopsis

The combined vision of two eyes (binocular vision). Stereopsis is one of the ways depth is perceived by the human brain. Other methods include the larger size of close objects and smaller size of distant objects even with one eye (monocular vision). The term comes from "stereo," which means "solid" and "3-dimensional" plus "opsis," meaning sight. See 3D visualization and stereoscopic 3D.
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The frequency of three-dimensional vision syndrome during and at the end of a movie was assessed.
Potency rates are not yet available for his group, but he said he expects good results because "nerve sparing is technically much easier to perform robotically since we operate in a bloodless field with magnification and three-dimensional vision.
The technology enables three-dimensional vision and what he calls "augmented reality"--the ability to superimpose ultrasound, MRI, or any other image on the operative field of vision.
Until now, medical device companies have had to use costly three-dimensional vision technology to accurately identify the size and orientation of artificial parts, and to correctly match those parts to their paperwork and packaging.
Technically speaking, holography permits three-dimensional vision of complex anatomic structures.
Hunter of McGill University in Montreal, working with colleagues from MIT and the University of Aukland in New Zealand, reports using a tele-microrobot system to grip and manipulate individual muscle cells while viewing the microscopic operation with a three-dimensional vision system.
HR-2000 three-dimensional vision inspection system makes automatic joint-quality decisions based on thousands of 3-D X, Y, and Z measurements of a given joint.
With the robot, however, you have three-dimensional vision and a greater degree of freedom, which gives you the ability to access hard-to-reach tissues," explained Dr.
Mahru-Z has a human-like body including a rotating head, arms, legs and six fingers plus three-dimensional vision to recognise chores that need to be tackled, media reports said Monday.

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