three-dimensional

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three-dimensional

, three-D, 3-D
1. of, having, or relating to three dimensions
2. (of a film, transparency, etc.) simulating the effect of depth by presenting slightly different views of a scene to each eye
3. having volume

three-dimensional

[′thrē di′men·chən·əl]
(science and technology)
Giving the illusion of depth, in three dimensions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Three-dimensionally printed models were created of anatomic pathology specimens, including radical nephrectomy (Figure 2) and pancreatoduodenectomy specimens (Figure 3).
Abstract: Fabric circuit boards (FCB), a new type of circuit board, are three-dimensionally deformable, highly stretchable, durable and washable, ideally for wearable electronic applications.
With Kobleder's technology, the cushioning can be designed three-dimensionally, with sport-specific movements in mind, and knitted directly into the garment, with no need for additional seams.
When barefoot, your feet move three-dimensionally," he says, "stretching the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in your feet, ankles, Achilles tendon, and calves.
Airspaces minimized three-dimensionally achieve 2,000 mm of water resistance, while an aerated fine-waffle structure provides excellent water-shedding performance.
The pterosaurs were sexually dimorphic, and five of their eggs are three-dimensionally preserved, marking a first worldwide.
But all these solutions are based on empirical dependence for estimation of three-dimensionally compressed concrete strength.
We sculpted the nose three-dimensionally, like carpenters," he said.
Mice were then anesthetized and a cast was made of the entire uterus and blood vessels, then mounted and three-dimensionally imaged by micro-CT.
Significant advantages of the innovative wet glue labelling are the patented overlay gearbox for easy adjustment of the exact label position, as well as the single, three-dimensionally adjustable glue segments.
They coated them with a dense three-dimensionally ordered layer of titanium dioxide nanotubes oriented vertically, like the sensilla.
Most of us see things three-dimensionally," Robert Morse, who starred with Winters in the 1965 movie "The Loved One," once said to The New York Times.