threnody


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threnody

, threnode
an ode, song, or speech of lamentation, esp for the dead
References in periodicals archive ?
A threnody is, as I'm sure you know, a song or piece of music expressing grief," reader Gordon Balmforth chided gently.
The doomed Russian poet Osip Mandelstam's threnody to the "wolfhound age" took only a single totalitarianism under consideration, not two.
When Rice explodes, barking "fuck you" over a threnody of dissonant strings ("Rootless Tree"), well, you're definitely not in James Blunt territory.
But for all its enormous sense of life, even An Autobiographical Novel, which as yet lacks a sequel dealing with Rexroth's fifty years on the Pacific coast,* is also an elegiac book, a threnody for a splendid past--pre-Great War Europe, the Midwest of the twenties, of which, in one of his poems, Rexroth says:
Against the paranoid, right-wing threnody of the book, the more sober parts of Re-Thinking Green seem genuinely subversive.
Like A Wedding Bouquet and Illuminations, all carefully woven of threaded choreographic vignettes, this moving threnody for Edwardian England looked shamefully shabby.
From "Where the Camera Cannot Go" to "A Threnody for Street Kids", "Photography and Propaganda" and much more, each writing lays bare the core of photography and politics--or sometimes, the core of the author.
Gordon, Lang and Wolfe conceived their Talmud-steeped threnody on loss in tandem with the writer Deborah Artman, whose 11 texts range from the simple litany of lost objects that strikingly opens the work ("I lost a sock .
These apothegms are the numbered stones with which Godard reconstructs in this film his melancholy threnody.
It is a moving threnody for what it feels like to be a nobody and how that feeling motivates him to do something to counter the negative state.
The result is a visual orchestration integrating quick-edit intensity and contemplative, elegiac tranquility--a threnody in the key of vexed moral reflection.
The Phoenix and Turtle," the Shakespeare poem closest in date of composition to A Lover's Complaint (if the vocabulary evidence is not misleading in assigning the latter to the seventeenth century), adopts a similar sort of narrative strategy, enclosing voice within voice: the five-stanza threnody that ends the poem is presented as a composition by a bewildered Reason, who is a personified abstraction within an anthem performed by (or among) a flock of birds who, on the instructions of the poet-speaker, have been summoned to a funeral by the "loudest" of their number.