throttle

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throttle

1. any device that controls the quantity of fuel or fuel and air mixture entering an engine
2. an informal or dialect word for throat

Throttle

 

a device whose cross section is considerably smaller than that of the pipeline leading to it. A throttle regulates the flow rate and changes other parameters (temperature, humidity, and superheating) of a working body flowing in a closed channel.

Throttles are mounted in front of a steam turbine to control loading by throttling the steam; in high-pressure steam lines they are used to reduce pressure at the point where the steam enters a low-pressure steam line (for example, in heating systems). They are also used in compressors and blowers to decrease the pressure of the gas at the intake and in refrigerators to expand the compressed gas in order to cool it. One type of throttle is an accelerator, which controls the supply of the fuel mixture to the cylinders of internal-combustion engines.

throttle

[′thräd·əl]
(mechanical engineering)

throttle

The control in an aircraft engine that regulates the power or thrust the pilot desires the engine to develop. It is basically a control unit, which controls the amount of fuel or the fuel-air mixture that can enter the engine. It is controlled by a throttle lever in the cockpit. This lever is referred to colloquially as a throttle. Also called a power lever or a thrust lever. See throttle friction nut.

throttle

To cause something to slow down or speed up. See CPU throttling, throttled transfer and bandwidth throttling.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has a bandwidth throttler, so if you need to use your PC, you can throttle it down so it uses less resources.
every stammerer, stutterer, throttler, constipator, involuntary confounder, and unconscious reiterator of the elements of speech (whatever attainments or faculties he may, in other respects, possess) is partially, and to a certain extent, either idiotic, or deranged: for what but derangement can it be called, to be constantly doing a thousand things that we neither intend to do, nor are conscious of doing?