thrust power

thrust power

[′thrəst ‚pau̇·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
The power usefully expended on thrust, equal to the thrust (or net thrust) times airspeed.

thrust power

The power usefully expended on the thrust, which is equal to the thrust (or net thrust) times air speed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The thrust power of the bigger cryogenic engine is 19.
The DD-110 features the latest radial piston hydraulic motor thrust drive that increases hydraulic efficiency for maximum thrust power, improved rotary speed and sliding rotary spindle for increased flexibility during pipe make up and breakout.
It can realize continuous variation of thrust power ranging from 1,500 to 7,500 newtons, according to Wu Weiren.
GAS TURBINES CAN EITHER PRODUCE THRUST POWER, LIKE A PROPELLER, OR TURN ELECTRIC GENERATORS, LIKE A WIND TURBINE, An axial flow gas turbine consists of many rows of rotating blades, interspersed with rows of stationary airfoils, called vanes or stators.
These jet engines tan contain hundreds of blades used to generate thrust power during normal operation.
The pilot had stopped the right engine because he had heard a strange sound coming from the engine while the plane was ascending and its thrust power started to fall, according to JAS.
The DD-110 features the latest radial piston hydraulic motor thrust drive that increases hydraulic efficiency for maximum thrust power, improved rotary speed, and sliding rotary spindle for increased flexibility during pipe make up and breakout.
As the engineer's most versatile energy converters, gas turbines producing thrust power continued in 2001 to propel most of the world's aircraft, both military and commercial.