thrust power

thrust power

[′thrəst ‚pau̇·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
The power usefully expended on thrust, equal to the thrust (or net thrust) times airspeed.

thrust power

The power usefully expended on the thrust, which is equal to the thrust (or net thrust) times air speed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The DD-110 features the latest radial piston hydraulic motor thrust drive that increases hydraulic efficiency for maximum thrust power, improved rotary speed and sliding rotary spindle for increased flexibility during pipe make up and breakout.
It can realize continuous variation of thrust power ranging from 1,500 to 7,500 newtons, according to Wu Weiren.
These jet engines tan contain hundreds of blades used to generate thrust power during normal operation.
The pilot had stopped the right engine because he had heard a strange sound coming from the engine while the plane was ascending and its thrust power started to fall, according to JAS.
The DD-110 features the latest radial piston hydraulic motor thrust drive that increases hydraulic efficiency for maximum thrust power, improved rotary speed, and sliding rotary spindle for increased flexibility during pipe make up and breakout.
As a result of this successful PLT demonstration, thrust power requirements for a wide range of NASA spacecraft formation flight configurations, such as SPECS and MAXIM, are well within today's space power budgets.
As a result of PTFF, thrust power requirements for a wide range of spacecraft configurations are well within today's space power budgets.
The new FADEC systems allow pilots more flexibility in matching take-off and climb thrust power with specific flight requirements.
These older aircraft would be permitted to fly as "Stage 3" compliant by applying limitations in takeoff weight, settings for flaps, or use of engine thrust power.