thymulin


Also found in: Medical.

thymulin

[′thī·myü·lən]
(immunology)
A zinc-dependent thymic hormone that regulates the differentiation of the immature thymocyte subpopulation and the function of mature T and natural killer cells and also functions as a transmitter between the neuroendocrine and immune systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thymulin (formerly called serum thymic factor) is a nonapeptide hormone secreted by human thymic epithelial cells and is essential for T-cell differentiation.
We confirmed this finding by determining serum thymulin concentrations in 5 patients, previously recruited for a prospective longitudinal analysis, (6) all of whom developed paradoxical TB-IRIS within 14 days of cART commencement.
14) A quantitative measure of thymic function is achieved by assaying the nonapeptide hormone thymulin produced by thymic epithelial cells.
We used 4 g arginine per day as similar doses have induced a significant increment of thymulin blood concentrations and [CD4.
Giving some of the 36 women 30 mg a day of zinc raised their levels of thymulin and interleukin 1, two signals that their immune systems were more able to fight off disease.
The changes that have been noted are atrophy of lymphoid tissue especially thymus, reduction in delayed hypersensitivity, lymphoproliferation, T cells especially T helper cells, thymulin, secretory IgA response, complements, natural killer (NK) cell activity, interleukinl (IL1), lysozymes, antibiotic affinity and phagocyte function (1).
The human thymus produces at least seven thymic proteins: thymopoietin, thymosin alpha, thymulin, thymic humoral factor, hormonal thymic factor, serum thymic factor, and other thymic factors.
In vitro lymphocyte-differentiating effects of Thymulin on lymphocyte subpopulations of severely malnourished children.