tiger moth


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tiger moth

any of a group of arctiid moths, mostly boldly marked, often in black, orange, and yellow, of the genera Arctia, Parasemia, Euplagia, etc., producing woolly bear larvae and typified by the garden tiger (Arctia caja)
References in periodicals archive ?
His description of his first flight since the accident which claimed his legs showed he had not lost his nerve, writing: "I approached Tiger Moth No DE197 like an ex-alcoholic taking his first whisky after a successful cure.
In the aftermath of the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940, almost any defence to stave off invasion was considered and three extraordinary Tiger Moth conversions were proposed.
In the aftermath of the Dunkirk evacuation in 1940, almost any anti-invasion idea was considered and three extraordinary Tiger Moth conversions were put forward.
The Tiger Moth, which was operated by the Royal Air Force as a training aircraft, was "wonderful" to fly, he recalled.
Cliff Crozier, 100, with the Tiger Moth Pictures: ROD KIRKPATRICK/ F STOP PRESS
The vintage aircraft generate good response from the crowd during airshows and in last couple of years, Tiger Moth gave a number of impressive performances.
The garden tiger moth, known for its "woolly bear" caterpillar, used to be widely found in UK gardens but has seen its population crash by 92% in the last 40 years.
On the 80th anniversary of IAF, the 1930s Tiger Moth biplane, the first resurrected aircraft of the vintage squadron of the force, was the only new addition to the flying display team for the event.
The latest example of this, the restoration of three Tiger Moths, was started four years ago, and finally reached fruition when the first of these, G-AMIV, was test flown on 2nd May 2011.
Former pilot takes flight in Tiger Moth to celebrate 80th birthday.
At the start of the second series, she finds her devotion rewarded when John pays her a flying visit - arriving in the farm on an RAF Tiger Moth training plane and taking her flying for a birthday treat.
Yet, the Tiger Moth proved a cheap, reliable and essential plane for fighting World War II, even though it wasn't easy to fly.