tipping point


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tipping point

The point in time in which a technology, procedure, service or philosophy has reached critical mass and becomes mainstream. See network effect. See also tip and ring.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other tipping points could lead to the disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet, pushing up sea levels another 23ft, a dieback of the Amazon rainforest, the loss of northern coniferous forest, the "greening" of the Sahara and the collapse of the Indian summer monsoon.
Depending upon the amount of food they received, populations in the deteriorating environment group reached the population viability tipping point after approximately 300 days.
On energy we are seeing early signs of an economic tipping point approaching.
Utah's tipping point in tech is homegrown, catalyzed by founder-led support for other founders, and it spans from budding entrepreneurs to the most prominent figures in the Salt Lake Valley.
Are there tipping points where that debt changes from helpful to harmful?
A Tipping Point for Liberty is easy to read even though its subject matter may make one uneasy: Its 105 articles on about 300 pages are each generally just a few pages long.
There are lists of positive and negative impacts for each tipping point, and much more information in the complete report.
The Tipping Point program builds on SSL's DARPA funded Dragonfly study to take the concept to a ground demonstration.
Permanent shifts are occurring and driving the industry to its tipping point.
Auditor General for Wales Huw Vaughan Thomas said: "Welsh councils are facing a financial tipping point.