Tony

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Tony

Tom Mix’s “Wonder Horse.” [Radio: “Tom Mix” in Buxton, 241–242]
See: Horse

Tony (Antoinette Perry Award)

presented annually for outstanding work in the Broadway theater. [Am. Hist.: Misc.]
See: Prize
References in periodicals archive ?
The event that proved a turning point in Gardner's personal life would also mark a turning point for his admirers in the tonier schools.
It's hard to sit down to a meal in a home anywhere in Chile or even in its tonier restaurants without being served something in a Pomaire pot.
Summers visited Harlem and afterward led a session in a crowded conference room at Chase Manhattan's headquarters at a tonier Park Avenue address.
The first "for hire" automobiles appeared in 1904 when someone began offering automobile tours of Winnipeg's business and tonier residential districts (Summer Outings `Round Winnipeg: Cycle, Auto, Carriage, Trolley and Boat.
The tonier ones - Campagne, Chez Shea, Il Bistro, the Pink Door - are perfect for a long evening of merrymaking.
Post has targeted the tonier "renters-by-choice" market by offering high-end services such as on-site dry cleaning, valet services, and package delivery.
Remember how in retail we had so many different department stores, from the low-end Klein's to the tonier B.
True, the Tony would be tonier if all these contentious factions hadn't existed, but extensive press coverage meant a boost at the box office.
Western Presbyterian: Western Presbyterian's battle against NIMBYISM began in 1990 when the International Monetary Fund (IMF) purchased the church's property for some $24 million in addition to building a new church for Western Presbyterian in the tonier neighborhood of Foggy Bottom only blocks away.
The ground shook with such fury that avalanches tumbled from the Olympic mountains and landslides ran into Lake Washington, near where some of Seattle's tonier neighborhoods now stand.
Residents hoped the groundbreaking would encourage tonier retailers to see the profits that could be made in the neighborhood, since 25% of the area's households earn more than $50,000.
But the tonier auction houses have been skittish: Can a big-ticket item like a Rembrandt be sold on the web, and can it be sold more profitably than in a live auction?