Tonometry


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Related to Tonometry: Applanation Tonometry

Tonometry

 

the measurement of pressure—usually referring specifically to intraocular pressure. All tonometric methods are based on measurement of the eyeball’s capacity for deformation.

The approximate magnitude of intraocular pressure can be estimated by digital tonometry—the examiner making a subjective judgment of the degree of firmness of the eye by pressing it with the fingers. Greater accuracy in tonometry is achieved by the use of tonometers of varying design. Impression tonometry measures the degree of indentation of the eyeball produced by the tonometer rod and translates the reading into measures of intraocular pressure. Applanation tonometry measures the extent to which the eye can be flattened; the imprint (or tonogram) produced by a cylinder’s pressure on the eye is in the shape of a small circle, whose dimensions are converted into an index of pressure.

References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, tonometry measurements vary according to the tonometer used and the examiner conducting the restraint (WHITACRE & STEIN, 1993).
Perform blood tonometry with a commercially available thin-film or bubble tonometer.
Keeping in view the variation in IOP measurements and risk factors in different ethnic populations and considering tonometry as the most valuable tool of glaucoma detection it would be necessary to undertake further studies on IOP distribution in different populations to determine its normal range and distribution.
Dynamic contour tonometry in keratoconus and postkeratoplasty eyes.
Noncontact tonometry has gained general acceptance, mostly among nonmedical eye care practitioners, as a screening tool for glaucoma.
Tonometer Diaton is the perfect solution in the following cases when the use of other tonometry devices is problematic or impossible: Keratitis, Conjunctivitis, Keratotone, Cornea Dimness, Keratoprosthesis, Keratoplastics, LASIK, LASEK, PRK, Astigmatism, Ametropy, etc.
Device for measuring arterial stiffness by the aplanatic tonometry piece.
The calibration curve for manometry versus tonometry was determined by artificially raising the IOP in 5mmHg increments up to 50mmHg (10-50mmHg), in open stopcock mode.
IP is usually measured by tonometry during a routine eye examination by your optician.