tooth decay


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tooth decay

[′tüth di‚kā]
(medicine)
Caries of the teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Five-year-olds in Birmingham are three-and-ahalf times more likely to suffer tooth decay than those in the South West Surrey constituency of the Secretary of State for Health.
But avoiding fluoridated tap water raises another public health concern; children are denied its protection from tooth decay.
Mr McCabe raised concerns in the House of Commons, saying: "In Birmingham, 29 per cent of fiveyear-olds suffer from tooth decay, which is significantly higher than the national average.
Overall, there were 45,224 cases of children and teenagers aged from infancy up to 19 who needed hospital treatment because of tooth decay in 2016/17.
Tooth decay occurs when foods containing carbohydrates (sugars and starches), such as breads, cereals, milk, soda, fruits, cakes, or candy are left on the teeth.
Although weve seen great improvements in tooth decay in school year 1 children over the last decade or so, there is scope for further improvement for the third of children still experiencing tooth decay.
In 2007-08 the proportion of five-year-old children with evidence of tooth decay stood at 47.
Chief Dental Officer for Wales Dr Colette Bridgeman said: "Although we've seen great improvements in tooth decay in school Year 1 children over the last decade or so, there is scope for further improvement for the third of children still experiencing tooth decay.
For a long time it was believed that tooth decay was a rapidly progressive phenomenon and the best way to manage it was to identify early decay and remove it immediately in order to prevent a tooth surface from breaking up into cavities.
Nationally, the number of five-year-olds suffering from tooth decay has dropped to its lowest level in almost a decade; just under 25% suffers from tooth decay.
Tooth decay can dramatically influence the health of a person if not taken care of.
The Health & Social Care Information Centre says children from low-income families are twice as likely to have tooth decay, linked to diet and dental care.