mobility

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mobility

[mō′bil·əd·ē]
(engineering)
The ability of an analytical balance to react to small load changes; affected by friction and degree of looseness in the balance components.
(fluid mechanics)
The reciprocal of the plastic viscosity of a Bingham plastic.
(physics)
Freedom of particles to move, either in random motion or under the influence of fields or forces.
(solid-state physics)

mobility

see SOCIAL MOBILITY, OCCUPATIONAL MOBILITY.

mobility

(1) An umbrella term for portable devices. See mobile device.

(2) The movement of packets in a network. See traffic engineering.
References in periodicals archive ?
Significant findings related to the teeth (eg, tooth mobility, tooth sensitivity, tooth decay, tooth wear) 7.
Interestingly tooth mobility was minimal after 4 weeks and there was radiographic evidence of new periapical bone formation as early as 2 months postoperative.
Increased gingival bleeding and gingival exudate, as well as a minor increase in tooth mobility, is associated with the menstrual cycle.
In this study, recording of tooth mobility greatly reduced a favourable prognosis.
Studies have shown that laser treatment, when used together with conventional treatment methods, produces improvement in classic symptoms of periodontal disease, such as gingival bleeding, pocket depth, attachment loss and tooth mobility.
This study has shown that about 47% of patients were observed to have some sort of tooth mobility problems, 58% of patients were observed to have gingival recession relative to abutments.
There is an increase in tooth mobility during corticotomy assisted orthodontic treatment due to the transient osteopenia without a change in bone matrix volume.
The areas were re-assessed for inflammation and tooth mobility at the maintenance visit.
nonsurgical extractions of periodontally involved permanent teeth with tooth mobility of +3 to +4.
During a clinical examination, in both dentitions, it is important to consider tooth colour (variable from normal to blue grey or yellow brown), tooth wear, abscess formation, tooth mobility and early loss of teeth [Barron et al.
An injury to the tooth supporting structures without increasing tooth mobility or displacement but with significant sensibility to the percurssion, is classified as: () concussion () subluxation () luxation () avulsion () none () I don't know 4.
Xerostomia was present in 87% patients followed by thickened mucosa (12%) , angular cheilitis (29%), periodontitis (41%), gingivitis (17%), tooth erosion (40%), tooth mobility (38%), ammonia like odour (Uraemic fetor) (45%), coated tongue (17%) , mucosal pallor (37%), metallic taste (48%) and mucosal pigmentation (20% ).